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Botanical literature

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The New York Botanical Garden: International Plant Science Center

In "combining modern technologies with a century of field and laboratory research," the New York Botanical Garden's International Plant Science Center "is one of the few institutions worldwide with the resources, collections, and expertise to develop the information needed to understand and manage plant diversity." This website grants considerable access to resources from the Center, including...

http://sweetgum.nybg.org/science/ih/
University and Jepson Herbaria

The University of California Berkeley's "University Herbarium (UC) and Jepson Herbarium (JEPS) represent the largest collection of herbarium material west of the Missouri Botanical Garden and the largest at a public university in the United States." Visitors can discover the scientific uses of the many specimens held in the UC, which was established in 1895. The website describes the JEPS's...

https://ucjeps.berkeley.edu/
Botanicus

The Missouri Botanical Garden Library has many lovely examples of 18th and 19th century botanical literature from all around the world. While they began digitizing some of these works in 1995, they recently decided to expand their collection to include non-illustrated works of significant importance to taxonomic botany. Drawing on support from the W.M. Keck Foundation and the Andrew W. Mellon...

http://www.botanicus.org/
Botanical Accuracy

Would you care if someone called a cat a mouse in the description of a medieval painting? What if books on plants were illustrated with the wrong plants? Botanical errors can be just as egregious as those involving art history, foodstuffs and other products. This delightful website looks at botanical mistakes in commercial and public venues and offers up educational information and commentary on...

http://www.botanicalaccuracy.com/
Interpersonal Botany

This fascinating collection is animated by one question: "How did people use print to structure and mediate their social relationships in Europe between 1700 and 1900?" Crafted by staff members at McGill University, the exhibition looks at objects that document a range of interpersonal practices in the field of botany. As the site suggests, "printed matter functioned in various ways to foster...

http://digital.library.mcgill.ca/interpersonal/index.php