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English language -- Etymology

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View Resource The Early Modern English Dictionaries Database

Edited by Ian Lancashire of the Department of English at the University of Toronto this online database offers access to 127,000 word-entries from eleven dictionaries from 1530 to 1657. Several search options are available and users may select individual dictionaries or all of them. Additional resources at the site include a helpful overview of EMEDD, a short piece on Renaissance word-meaning, a...

http://www.english.utoronto.ca/Page4.aspx
View Resource World Wide Words: Exploring the English Language

Created by Michael Quinion, a freelance wordsmith and researcher into new words for Oxford Dictionaries, this site focuses on the history of the English language and the development of new words. Each week, users will find definitions and histories of words and phrases both old and new. This week's offerings include "upskilling," "abracadabra," "wormwood," and "wassail." In addition, the site...

http://www.worldwidewords.org
View Resource Online Etymology Dictionary

In the tradition of that great lover of words, Samuel Johnson, Douglas Harper (an amateur etymologist) has compiled one of the first free online etymology dictionaries. The etymologies are compiled in alphabetical order and parsed into smaller sections for easy viewing. As Mr. Harper notes in the introduction to the dictionary, "Think of it like looking at pictures of your friends' parents when...

https://www.etymonline.com/
View Resource Luciferous Logolepsy: Dragging Obscure Words Into the Light of Day

Developed by Alan M. Taylor, a Web site developer based out of Seattle, Washington, the Luciferous Logolepsy is a collection of over 9,000 obscure English words. The name of the project is (not surprisingly) based on two obscure words: Luciferous, which means illuminating and logolepsy, which means an obsession with words. As Taylor himself notes, "For the purposes of this project, words are...

http://www.greater-san-antonio.com/kokogiakcom/logolepsy/
View Resource Beastly Garden of Wordy Delights

Have you ever encountered a bloat of hippos or a charm of finches? This entertaining website, created by researcher and educator Melissa Kaplan, provides various descriptive terms for an extensive list of animals. Part 1 of the site contains plurals, collective nouns, and words for sounds, gender, and offspring. For example, a female kangaroo is a flyer, and a young swan is cygnet. Part 2 offers...

http://www.anapsid.org/beastly.html
View Resource The origins of "OK" explored

The Straight Dope: What Does "OK" stand for? http://www.straightdope.com/columns/read/503/what-does-ok-stand-for Linguistically, America is A-OK http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/content/article/2010/10/29/AR2010102907644.html The 'O' Word http://www.nytimes.com/2010/11/21/books/review/Blount-t.html?src=me American Languages: Our Nation's Many...

https://scout.wisc.edu/report/2010/1124
View Resource The Allusionist Screenshot

The Allusionist is a delightful podcast dedicated to "small adventures in language." Hosted by British broadcaster and podcaster Helen Zaltzman, the Allusionist covers a single issue related to the English language in each twenty minute podcast. Zaltzman is especially interested in issues of how language and society inform one another. One recent episode features an interview with Isaac Siemens on...

https://www.theallusionist.org/