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Excavations (Archaeology) -- Turkey

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View Resource TAY: Archeological Settlements of Turkey Project

This ambitious project is the first, and currently only, culture/settlement inventory of an entire country on the Internet. The TAY project was begun in 1993 "to build a chronological inventory of findings about the cultural heritage of Turkey." TAY accomplishes this mission by locating, identifying, and protecting archaeological sites, as well as providing a huge data pool and scientific...

http://tayproject.eies.itu.edu.tr/enghome.html
View Resource Mysteries of Catalhoyuk

Catalhoyuk (chat-al-hoy-ook), which means "forked mound," is a major Neolithic archaeological site in south-central Turkey considered to be one of the first "urban" centers, built between 8,000 and 10,0000 years ago. This engaging multimedia Website, developed by the Science Museum of Minnesota for a general audience, examines the big mysteries underlying Catalhoyuk, as seen through the eyes of an...

http://www.sci.mus.mn.us/catal/
View Resource The Science Museum of Minnesota: Mysteries of Çatalhöyük

Courtesy of the Science Museum of Minnesota, middle-schoolers can take a virtual trip to an archaeological dig in central Turkey, southeast of the modern city of Konya. In 1998, archaeologists excavated a Neolithic settlement, that 9,000 years ago, was one of the world's major cities with a population of about 10,000 people. Çatalhöyük is of interest to archaeologists since it was settled at a...

https://www.smm.org/catal/
View Resource The Assos Excavations

Located on the Aegean Sea in Turkey, the ancient city of Assos was quite a bustling metropolis thousands of years ago. It also happens to be the site where the Archaeological Institute of America (AIA) had one of their very first excavations. Today, the site is overseen by archaeologist Nurettin Arslan of the University of Canakkale. This interactive online feature takes visitors inside their...

https://archive.archaeology.org/assos/tour/