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Mars (Planet) -- Geology

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Sedimentary Mars

"December 4, 2000 -- In what ultimately may be their most significant discovery yet, Mars scientists say high-resolution pictures showing layers of sedimentary rock paint a portrait of ancient Mars that long ago may have featured numerous lakes and shallow seas." This exciting news comes from a recent NASA news article detailing the latest finds from the Mars Orbiter Camera on NASA's Mars Global...

https://apod.nasa.gov/apod/ap030815.html
Martian Meteorite Discovered in Oman Desert

A fist-sized meteorite with a mineralogy and isotopic signature suggesting Martian origin has been discovered by Swiss researchers in the Sayh al Uhaymir region of desert in Oman. On June 15, scientists at the University of Bern announced their finding of the Martian meteorite, named Sayh al Uhaymir 094 and one of only eighteen known on Earth. Only recently have scientists been combing the deserts...

https://scout.wisc.edu/report/se/2001/0620
Mars Exploration Rover Mission

Scheduled for launch in 2003, two NASA rovers will set out to explore Mars and determine whether water ever existed on the planet. This is the home page of the Mars rovers, and it has a great deal of information about the specifications and technology of the missions. Detailed descriptions of the scientific instruments equipped on each rover are provided. Color diagrams show the main components of...

https://mars.nasa.gov/mer/
Planetary Surface Materials: Haskin Research Group

From the Department of Earth and Planetary Science at Washington University in St. Louis, this Web site addresses the Haskin's Research group's interests "in the nature and early histories of the Moon and Mars and in the origins of terrestrial materials that are analogs to lunar and Martian rocks." The site illustrates the group's work on developing the Mars Microbeam Raman Spectrometer, which...

http://epsc.wustl.edu/haskin-group/
Arizona State University: Mars Global Surveyor Thermal Emission Spectrometer

The thermal emission spectrometer (TES) is a scientific instrument created at Arizona State University to provide detailed looks at the composition of Mars. The website features ASU's spectral library of Earth's minerals and rocks which can be used for comparison with those obtained from Mars and for interpretation of remote sensing data of Earth. Researchers can learn about the many projects...

http://tes.asu.edu/
2003 Mars Exploration Rovers Athena Science Payload: Mini-Thermal Emission Spectrometer (Mini-TES)

This website was created by Arizona State University to provide current information about Mini-Thermal Emission Spectrometer (Mini-TES) and details about infrared spectroscopy. Students and educators can learn about the instrument's capabilities to collect mineralogy and thermophysical data on the terrain of Mars. Scientists can view the first mineral map gathered from the Mini-TES aboard the Mars...

http://minites.asu.edu/
Phoenix Mars Lander seeks water and "life" on Mars

Phoenix Mars Mission http://phoenix.lpl.arizona.edu/ Phoenix Mars Lander Spotted from Space http://www.space.com/missionlaunches/080527-phoenix-mars-update.html NASA: 'Extreme programming' controls Mars Lander robot http://www.computerworld.com/action/article.do?command=viewArticleBasic&articleId=9094138&intsrc=hm_list iTunesU adds Phoenix Mars Mission...

https://scout.wisc.edu/report/2008/0606
ChemCam on Mars

In the past several years, news outlets have come alive with more and more information about the past and present of Mars. The source of much of that fascinating data has been the ChemCam instrument, a suite of remote sensing instruments that have been sending back daily samples from the surface of the Red Planet using two instruments, a laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) and a remote...

https://www.msl-chemcam.com/
Rewind the Red Planet

National Geographic recently published Rewind the Red Planet, an interactive feature that demonstrates how the landscape of Mars has changed over the past 3.8 billion years. As this feature demonstrates, scientists aren't entirely sure what Mars looked like 3.8 billion years ago. Some evidence suggests that Mars featured crater lakes and possibly even an ocean. Other evidence, however, suggests...

https://www.nationalgeographic.com/science/2016/11/exploring...