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Science -- Podcasts

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The Missing Link

Professor Elizabeth Green Musselman of Southwestern University is excited about the history of science, and she's devised a rather ingenious way to get others excited about it as well. She's created a monthly podcast which can be found on this site, along with lists of suggested readings for those who are looking for additional information. Episodes currently available include "Time's Arrow",...

https://missinglinkpodcast.wordpress.com/
Podcasts from the University of Oxford

The University of Oxford offers free podcasts of lectures by Oxford professors on this very fine website. Nine different divisions of the University are represented, including the Humanities, Medical Sciences, Continuing Education, and Life Sciences. By clicking on "show media items" under the description of each lecture, you can see all the titles in the lecture series, and choose from there....

http://podcasts.ox.ac.uk/
Podcasts from the Society for Applied Anthropology & the University of North Texas

The Society for Applied Anthropology (SfAA) has moved into the world of podcasts quite nicely with this fine set of talks, lectures, and discussions culled from their annual meetings. The site was created and is currently maintained by Jen Cardew, a master's student in applied business anthropology at the University of North Texas. Those individuals who've never listened (or heard about) podcasts...

https://www.appliedanthro.org/
R.Science Podcast

The Royal Society, based in the United Kingdom, is not only 350 years old, but is also not about the royal family. Rather, The Royal Society is all about science--influencing science policy and debating scientific issues, with other scientists and the public. Their website is loaded with resources, including the R.Science Podcast, the main podcast of the Royal Society. Monthly episodes include...

https://royalsociety.org/blog/
The Engines of Our Ingenuity

This website is from the public radio program The Engines of Our Ingenuity, which has been airing on the radio from the University of Houston for 20 years. The radio show is about the human inventiveness that informs our culture and it's no wonder the program has been on the air for so long, as such a topic seems inexhaustible. Because the show is only available on 30 public radio stations,...

https://uh.edu/engines/
EXPLO.TV

Even though EXPLO.TV sounds like an edgy punk website, it's actually the video component of the Exploratorium: Museum of Science, Art and Human Perception in San Francisco. This website has some excellent ways to learn about science--such as webcasts, podcasts, and video clips. "Upcoming Webcasts" is featured on the homepage, and there are a number of fine webcasts here. Because the webcasts are...

https://www.exploratorium.edu/video
The Guardian's Science Weekly Podcast

Would you like to go around the world on a hunt for a lost rubber duck? How does learning about language sound? These are but a few of the topics covered in the Guardian's Science weekly podcast. Visitors will be delighted to learn that they can explore this vast buffet of science topics at their leisure. New visitors to the site can look through the Recent Shows area or move on down to the...

http://www.theguardian.com/science/series/science
BBC Science in Action: Podcasts & Downloads

The BBC has gone above and beyond the call of duty with these wonderful podcasts that deal with various new developments in science from around the world. The series is called "Science in Action" and a new podcast is added every week. Recent episodes have dealt with theories of supersymmetry, climate records, Mayan civilization, and how different meteorological events have influenced the course of...

https://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/p002vsnb/episodes/downloads
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Scientific American: 60-Second Science

Science in a minute? Sure, why not! Scientific American is offering up these bite-sized offerings that give a brief intro to a range of science-related topics and investigations. New, minute-long offerings are added every weekday, and recent additions have included "Fly Cells Divide by the Clock," "Twitter Reveals Language Geographic Distribution," and "Bed Bugs Bollixed by Bean." Visitors can...

https://www.scientificamerican.com/multimedia/
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Science: Podcast

Brown dwarfs, numerosity maps, and social learning in bird migration are but a few of the topics covered within these excellent podcasts offered up by Science magazine. The audio explorations here date back to 2005 and users can browse around at their leisure. Some of the recent offerings include conversations about North Korean volcanoes, faulty ribosomes, and how pesticides might be used to...

https://www.sciencemag.org/podcasts
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