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(1 classification) (4 resources)

Greek literature

Classification
Translations into English. (1)

Resources
View Resource VRoma: A Virtual Community for Teaching and Learning Classics

The product of a recent NEH Teaching with Technology Grant, this two-tiered site promises to be an engaging and extensive resource for Classics courses. The first tier is an online "place," modeled upon the ancient city of Rome, where students and teachers can interact live via a traditional MOO session (information on registration requests and the MOO interface is provided). Within this...

http://www.vroma.org/
View Resource Classics Unveiled

Classics Unveiled was developed by Neil Jenkins, Sumair Mirza and Jason Tang as a way to teach the web-browsing public about the various aspects of the ancient world, ranging from the massive world of Greek and Roman mythology, Roman history, Roman culture, and the Latin language and its pervasive influence on English. The site is divided into four primary areas, and visitors may opt to browse...

http://www.classicsunveiled.com
View Resource Sicily: Art and Invention

Co-organized by the J. Paul Getty Museum, the Cleveland Museum of Art, and the Assessorato dei Beni Culturali e dell'Identità Siciliana, Sicily: Art and Invention celebrates 2013 as the Year of Italian Culture in the United States. To complement the exhibit (on view at the Getty Museum until August) the website is organized into five thematic sections: The Greeks in Sicily, Religion and Ritual,...

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http://www.getty.edu/art/exhibitions/sicily/index.html
View Resource The Chicago Homer

Who knows this rare bard, the late poet Homer? A team of dedicated classicists at Northwestern University know him quite well and this project offers ample evidence of their abilities. Project editors Ahuvia Kahane and Martin Mueller have worked with others to create a multilayered database of works including the Iliad and the Odyssey in four separate erudite translations. Clicking on the Enter...

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http://homer.library.northwestern.edu/