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Human genome

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Resources
View Resource Science Magazine: A Gene Map of the Human Genome

The first report of the international research consortium organized to map gene-based sequence tagged site markers is now available on the web as an integrated gene map. The human genome is thought to harbor 50,000 to 100,000 genes, of which about half have been sampled to date in the form of expressed sequence tags. More than 16,000 human genes have been mapped relative to a framework map that...

http://science.sciencemag.org/content/274/5287/540
View Resource GenStructure/bionet.genome.gene-structure: Genome and Chromatin Structure and Function Newsgroup

The purpose of this moderated newsgroup is to provide a proper forum for the discussion of issues pertaining to and involving genome and/or chromatin structure and function. Primarily it should enable those researchers who work in genome/chromatin structure or related fields to communicate ideas and information, as well as provide a chance for collaboration among national and international...

http://www.bio.net/hypermail/genstructure/
View Resource The Human Genome Unveiled: Publication of Sequence and Initial Scientific Analyses

This week's In The News highlights the landmark publication of the complete human genome sequence and its scientific interpretation. Spearheaded by two separate approaches and funding sources, the outcome of some ten years of hard work -- and moments of intense competition -- is the release of two complete sequences: one led by Craig Venter of Celera Genomics (a private venture with limited access...

https://scout.wisc.edu/report/se/2001/0214
View Resource Science: Human Genome Special Issue

The week of 16 February 2001 scientists published a rough draft of the three billion letters of the human genetic code. Two complete sequences were actually released, one by a consortium of publicly funded laboratories and the other by a private venture, Celera Genomics. To mark this event, Science published the International Human Genome Sequencing Consortium and the US National Human Genome...

http://science.sciencemag.org/content/291/5507
View Resource The Genomic Revolution

In honor of the one-year anniversary of the first working draft of the human genome, the American Museum of Natural History (AMNH) brings the Genomic Revolution to the Web. Divided into seven primary sections, which are further broken down into subsections (e.g., Gene Therapy, Nature and Nurture), the exhibit provides a good, basic introduction to the science of genetics. AMNH does attempt to...

https://www.amnh.org/global-business-development/traveling-e...
View Resource University of California Santa Cruz Human Genome Symposium 2001 Webcast

A live webcast of the public forum, held in conjunction with the University of California - Santa Cruz Human Genome Symposium 2001, was transmitted from Santa Cruz on August 25, 2001. The entire Webcast can be viewed in a variety of formats (RealMedia, Windows Media, QuickTime, Cisco IP/TV, MacTV, or MIM). The purpose of the forum, which included experts in human genetics and biomedical research,...

https://genomesymposium.ucsc.edu/
View Resource Omics Gateway

Over the last few weeks, scientists announced they have completed mapping Chromosome 21, the chromosome associated with Down's syndrome, epilepsy, Lou Gehrig's disease, and Alzheimer's. Researchers hope the achievement will lead to treatments in the future. Nature Magazine, features a free page, Genome Gateway, with online original research papers from Nature and Nature Genetics relating to...

http://www.nature.com/omics/index.html?foxtrotcallback=true&...
View Resource National Human Genome Research Institute: Talking Glossary of Genetic Terms

Both students and general users will appreciate this glossary, which is designed to help people with non-scientific backgrounds "to better understand the terms and concepts behind genetic research." Provided by NHGRI, which oversees the National Institutes of Health's role in the Human Genome Project (see the March 26, 1999 Scout Report), the glossary offers phonetic spelling, a brief definition,...

https://www.genome.gov/glossary/
View Resource 50 Years of DNA

As 2003 marks the completion of the human genome sequence and the 50th anniversary of the discovery of the DNA double helix, the Internet has exploded with noteworthy Web sites on the topic. The following represent just some of what the Web has to offer. The first site is the homepage of the National Human Genome Research Institute (1) -- a good place to start even if the content and presentation...

https://scout.wisc.edu/report/nsdl/ls/2003/0516
View Resource Nature Web Focus: The Y Chromosome

The journal Nature presents this online special feature on the recently sequenced Y chromosome. The Web site offers a number of free informative resources, including an account of the sequencing project as well as related scientific papers and letters published in the journal. An archive of Y chromosome-related articles are also available for registered users (no cost for registration). In all,...

https://s3-service-broker-live-deffee85-cb72-42be-ab90-7771e...
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