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Newberry: Religious Change in Print, 1450-1700

2017 marks the 500th anniversary of Martin Luther's 95 theses, which sparked the Protestant Reformation. The Newberry Library recently launched this project that is dedicated to "exploring how religion and print challenged authority, upended society, and helped make the medieval world modern." For those who can't make the trip to Chicago, the library offers this online exhibition. This exhibit is organized into a series of chapters that feature short essays and digitized documents that illustrate the role of religion in the daily life of early-modern Europe and colonial America and the ways in which print culture facilitated and shaped significant changes in religion and society. Included in this collection are the Gutenberg Bible; Luther's 1520 pamphlets On the Babylonian Captivity of the Church and To the German Nobility on the Reform of the Christian Estate; a map that appeared in Luther's Catechism Translated into the Language of American Indians in Virginia (1696); a manuscript of Increase Mather's Cases Concerning Witchcraft (circa 1700); and a page from a 1690 Madrid printing of The Poems of the Only Poetess in America, the Tenth Muse, Sister Juana Ines de la Cruz.
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Date of Scout Publication 2017-11-10
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