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Pew Research Center: A Majority of Teens Have Experienced Some Form of Cyberbullying

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The rise of the internet has given teens in recent decades a much different experience than those in past generations. In September 2018, the Pew Research Center released a study examining American teens and cyberbullying. This report, authored by senior researcher Monica Anderson, found that 59 percent of teens in the US "have personally experienced at least one of six types of abusive online behaviors" classified by Pew as cyberbullying, including name-calling, spreading false rumors, and receiving physical threats. Despite the prevalence of cyberbullying, the study found that a majority of teens feel that parents are doing a good job of handling cyberbullying. However, most teens are critical of how other groups, such as teachers, politicians, and social media sites, are addressing this issue. This study was based on Pew surveys conducted in March and April of 2018 of 743 US teens aged 13-17 and 1,058 parents of teens. Readers interested in more details may read the full nineteen-page report online or download it as a PDF. Readers may also visit links to related Pew publications, such as "Q&A: How and why we studied teens and cyberbullying."
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GEM Subject
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Scout Publication
Date of Scout Publication 2018-10-12
Archived Scout Publication URL https://scout.wisc.edu/report/2018/1012

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