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Indians of North America -- Ethnic identity.

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View Resource who stole the tee pee?

who stole the tee pee? is a phrase coined by artist George Littlechild, as a way of asking how contact and coexistence with White culture during the last 300 years has altered Native American traditions and beliefs. Organized by the Smithsonian's National Museum of the American Indian (NMAI) and Atlatl, an organization that promotes the work of contemporary Native American Artists, this exhibition...

http://www.nmai.si.edu/exhibitions/who_stole_the_teepee/inde...
View Resource Lakota na Dakota Wowapi Oti Kin

The Lakota na Dakota Wowapi Oti Kin is a one-stop information portal containing Internet resources on people of Lakota and Dakota descent (also known as Sioux or Siouan peoples). Created and maintained by Professor Martin Brokenleg of Augustana College and Dr. Raymond Bucko, S.J. of Creighton University, this site offers Web links in various categories including art and artists / music and...

https://ccas.creighton.edu/
View Resource Camping With the Sioux: Fieldwork Diary of Alice Cunningham Fletcher

Anthropologist Alice Fletcher lived with Dakota Sioux women on reservations in Nebraska and South Dakota for six weeks in the fall of 1881 and recorded her experiences in two journals. This digital version of her diaries made available by the National Anthropological Archives at the Smithsonian Institution includes her daily entries, 26 drawings, and 36 photographs that can be viewed alongside the...

https://teachinghistory.org/history-content/website-reviews/...
View Resource Drawing the Western Frontier: The James E. Taylor Album

The National Museum of Natural History, in collaboration with the National Anthropological Archives, has recently placed the James E. Taylor Album online for ready access. James E. Taylor was a professional artist who worked throughout the last four decades of the nineteenth century, supplying numerous national newspapers with illustrations and drawings based on on-site descriptions and first-hand...

https://anthropology.si.edu/naa/index.htm
View Resource National NAGPRA

The Native American Graves Protection and Repatriation Act (NAGPRA) is a Federal law passed in 1990 that provides a process by which museums and Federal agencies (such as the U.S Corps of Engineers) to return certain Native American cultural items, including human remains and sacred objects, to lineal descendants, culturally affiliated Indian tribes, and Native Hawaiian organizations. Given that...

https://www.nps.gov/nagpra/
View Resource The Harvard Project on American Indian Economic Development

The Harvard Project on American Indian Economic Development was started in 1987 by Professors Stephen Cornell and Joseph P. Kalt. The Project's primary goal is "to understand and foster the conditions under which sustained, self-determined social and economic development is achieved among American Indian nations." To accomplish this goal, the Project has sponsored a number of conferences and...

https://hpaied.org/