The Scout Report -- Volume 20, Number 20

The Scout Report -- Volume 20, Number 20

The Scout Report

May 23, 2014 -- Volume 20, Number 20

A Publication of Internet Scout
Computer Sciences Department, University of Wisconsin-Madison




Research and Education

  Visionary Engineering: Harold "Doc" Edgerton
  Calisphere: Disasters
  Teach the Earth
  National Archives: Docs Teach
  Open Source Physics
  Duke University: Sanford School of Public Policy
  Science Fair Projects in Biology, Natural History and Agriculture Science
  Lesley University Library: Data Sources and Teaching Resources

General Interest

  e-Archives: Governors Web Records
  Idaho Trails
  Unearthing St. Augustine's Colonial Heritage
  Robert R. McCormick Foundation: Resources
  Bay Area Television Archive
  U.S. Copyright Office: Historical Information
  WSU Vancouver Historic Collection
  Gauguin: Metamorphoses

Network Tools

  Delete It Later
  ReMarkable

In The News

  Ancient underwater volcano, Ka?ena, discovered in Hawai?i



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Research and Education

Visionary Engineering: Harold "Doc" Edgerton

·http://edgerton-digital-collections.org/

Noted inventor and beloved MIT professor Harold "Doc" Edgerton was a renaissance man without peer. The Edgerton Digital Collections (EDC) project brings together 22,000 still images of Doc, along with other scientific items and a range of short films. First-time visitors should click on Doc's Life to get a feel for this life well-lived through eight thematic areas. The Galleries are a wonderful find and contain some of his most iconic images, organized into themes such as Creatures, Humans, Bullets and Blasts, and Athletics. A collection of videos can also be viewed on the site. Fun finds include time lapse videos of the Boston skyline from the 1960s, cactus flowers, and crawling starfish. [KMG]


Calisphere: Disasters

·http://www.calisphere.universityofcalifornia.edu/mapped/disasters/

The talented archivists at Calisphere have curated a range of subjects on California history as part of their Local History Mapped series. This particular feature takes on Disasters in the Golden State by looking into the way disasters have affected buildings during the 19th and early 20th centuries. It's a great subject and visitors can use the View Map feature to explore the state from San Francisco to San Diego. The homepage provides interested parties with a brief synopsis of each major disaster type, along with resources for teachers, including class activities based on thematic collections of these images. Additionally the site includes a helpful document titled "How to Use Local History Mapped" and some complementary links from the Joint Committee on Geographic Education. [KMG]


Teach the Earth

·http://serc.carleton.edu/teachearth/index.html

Teach the Earth is a portal into "the rich geoscience education content available through dozens of independent project websites." Created by the Science Education Resource Center (SERC) at Carleton College, the site offers up thousands of pages of activities, workshops, course descriptions, and more. Visitors can use the Explore Topics and Themes area to look around the materials. The Popular Topics area is another great place to start as it contains links and information related to resources on earthquakes, evolution, and climate change. Additionally, the site contains information about SERC workshops, helpful email lists, and discussion boards. [KMG]


National Archives: Docs Teach

·http://docsteach.org/

Historical documents live and breathe on this site, and just a bit of technology makes them truly shine. Created by the National Archives, this site brings together thousands of documents for use by educators and students. First-time visitors are encouraged to start with the Find Activities area. Here, they can look through different historical eras, such as Civil War and Reconstruction and The Emergence of Modern America, for dozens of sample activities that draw on photographs, letters, wills, legal documents, and much more. Visitors can also browse through the items by tool type, such as Focusing on Details and Interpreting Data. Visitors can even use the Create Your Own Tool feature to use existing documents to create a personal and helpful instructional activity. [KMG]


Open Source Physics

·http://www.compadre.org/osp/

The Open Source Physics (OSP) Collection brings together ?curriculum resources that engage students in physics, computation, and computer modeling." Visitors can look at the featured tools and resources on the homepage, which covers topics such as Newton's laws, moon phases, and working with physics simulators. Moving on, OSP News explores exciting new apps that can be used with existing resources. The Curriculum Packages should also not be missed. Here, visitors can learn how to combine computer simulations with tutorial materials and student worksheets. [KMG]


Duke University: Sanford School of Public Policy

·http://research.sanford.duke.edu/papers/

With their breadth of experience and policy expertise, the scholars at Duke University's Sanford School of Public Policy have authored hundreds of papers and reports. This site provides access to these reports and includes such papers as "Diehard Fans and the Ivory Tower's Populist Reach" and "Racial and Economic Diversity in North Carolina's Schools: An Update.? This current archive dates back to 2001 and visitors can search the reports by title, date of publication, or author. It's a great way to get acquainted with the Sanford School?s research and policy observations. Additionally, visitors can sign up to receive updates about new works. [KMG]


Science Fair Projects in Biology, Natural History and Agriculture Science

·http://www.loc.gov/rr/scitech/tracer-bullets/bio-agtb.html

This site is a bit "old-school" in the best way possible. Crafted by the subject experts at the Library of Congress, this guide profiles print resources for teachers seeking to plan, prepare, and execute science fair projects in biology, natural history, or other related fields. Visitors can look over the Subject Headings to get started and they can also look over topical areas that include Handbooks, Related Titles, and Journals. It's a well curated list that includes links to a range of resources. The Internet area also contains some useful links on Educating about Agriculture and Agriculture in the Classroom. [KMG]


Lesley University Library: Data Sources and Teaching Resources

·http://research.lesley.edu/content.php?pid=98065&sid=735233

Teaching science can be a daunting endeavor. However, whether you?re a first-time teacher or a seasoned veteran you will find much to appreciate on this website from Lesley University. Created by subject librarians, the site includes data sources for those working with upper level high school students as well as advanced undergraduates and includes teaching resources for students of all ages. On the Teaching Resources side, visitors can look over high quality sites, such as the Biology Corner and Living Things, which offer up worksheets and lab activities in biology and the natural sciences. On the Data Sets side of the site visitors can look over resources such as the Internet Bird Collection and the very useful Fish Base, which is a global information system on fishes that caters to scientists, fisheries managers, and zoologists. [KMG]


General Interest

e-Archives: Governors Web Records

·http://kdla.ky.gov/records/e-archives/Pages/GovWebRecords.aspx

What happens to former governors' websites? Some of them are picked up on Archive.org while others just disappear. The Kentucky Department for Libraries and Archives has created the Electronic Records Archives to bring together web records from the Office of the Governor. Visitors can look over the Website Snapshots to look over the official sites of former governors, press photographs, and a list of speeches from governors from 1995 to the present day. Historians and information science specialists will find this site to be a welcome resource and one that is well worth bookmarking. [KMG]


Idaho Trails

·http://www.trails.idaho.gov/trails/

Interested in exploring Idaho? This engaging site from the Idaho State Parks is perfect for explorers, hikers, and anyone with an interest in this beautiful state. Visitors can zoom in and out, investigate different Layers, such as regional and state boundaries, and even explore the map according to topography, National Geographic cultural and historical data, and street views. It's a great way to learn more about the state and visitors even have the ability to print out their own cartographic creations. [KMG]


Unearthing St. Augustine's Colonial Heritage

·http://ufdc.ufl.edu/usach

What is the history of St. Augustine, Florida all about? This remarkable archive funded by the National Endowment for the Humanities offers up over 10,000 maps, drawings, photographs and documents that tell the story of the past four hundred years in this area. The partners involved in this wonderful project include the City of St. Augustine's department of heritage tourism, the St. Augustine Historical Society, and the Government House. Items of note include archaeological renderings, newspaper clippings, conceptual drawings of structures from the area, and maps that include plans of the city from the 17th to 20th centuries. It's a great collection and it's worth nothing that over 60 of the items here are in Spanish. [KMG]


Robert R. McCormick Foundation: Resources

·http://www.mccormickfoundation.org/page.aspx?pid=640

Created as a charitable trust in 1955, the Robert R. McCormick Foundation works to "develop citizen leaders and works to make life better in our communities.? This particular corner of its site brings together a range of resources for teachers, students, policy researchers, and others. The site contains four areas: Tools for Learning, Research & Reports, Multimedia Gallery, and Stay in the Loop. A subset of Tools for Learning is the Tools for Journalists area. Here, visitors can look over resources for covering news stories along with the "Chicago is the World" resource for writing about different ethnic groups. In Research & Reports, visitors can look over recent reports which include, "The Youngest Illinoisians: A Statistical Look at Infants and Toddlers in Illinois,? and a range of other reports dating back to 2012. The Multimedia Gallery contains links to videos that report on outreach efforts as well as special collaborative efforts with other organizations. [KMG]


Bay Area Television Archive

·http://digital-collections.library.sfsu.edu/cdm/landingpage/collection/p16737coll5

Created in 1982, the Bay Area Television Archive is housed in the San Francisco State University J. Paul Leonard Library?s Department of Special Collections. The Archive preserves over 4,000 hours of newsfilm, documentaries and other programs produced around the Bay Area from 1939 to 2005. This online archive contains just five films, but they are all gems. The first is a a clip of Marlon Brando and Black Panthers at a funeral in 1968 and other items include a conversation with Harvey Milk and an excerpt from the series "Blacks, Blues, Blacks.? This particular vignette features Maya Angelou interviewing political activists and community members on the streets of Watts in Los Angeles. [KMG]


U.S. Copyright Office: Historical Information

·http://www.copyright.gov/history/index.html

This site is dedicated to copyright law and the national copyright system and has a lot to offer. For starters, the "Biographies of the Registers of Copyrights" is a real pip, as it contains profiles of the individuals who have served in this key government position since the days of Thorvald Solberg, who assumed the office in 1897 and served until 1930. The site also contains more wordy and technical items, including the complete text of the United States Copyright Code. There are also a number of learned articles on copyright here, including "A Sneeze of Historic Proportions" and "You Wrote It, Now Copyright It.? The site?s fun "Copyright Lore" area includes artless on Mark Twain's fight for international copyright protection and information about the world's biggest card catalog, which is part of the U.S. Copyright Office. [KMG]


WSU Vancouver Historic Collection

·http://library.vancouver.wsu.edu/archive/wsuv

This fun collection brings together items from three collections in the Washington State University (WSU) Vancouver Library Archive, including items from the WSU 20th Anniversary Oral History Project, campus environmental impact statements, and campus master plans. In a very real sense, it's a potpourri of materials that will interest folks who care about the built environment, sustainability, and the history of this corner of Washington. The oral histories are quite fascinating, as well as the Photographs area which offers a range of images documenting the history of this campus, including some remarkable aerial shots of southwestern Washington. Finally, the Ephemera section lives up to its name as it has everything from a 1992 course schedule to a curious pamphlet for a microcomputer seminar series in 1984. [KMG]


Gauguin: Metamorphoses

·http://www.moma.org/interactives/exhibitions/2014/gauguin/

Most of us think of Gauguin as the painter of a lush tropical paradise, populated with beautiful brown women with flowers tucked into their hair. This exhibition from the Museum of Modern Art in New York City (MoMA) documents Gauguin's experiments in other mediums in addition to paint and canvas. Over the course of his lifetime, Gauguin worked in wood carving, ceramics, lithography, wood cut printing, monotype printing, transfer drawing, as well as drawing and writing. The exhibition features individual examples of these types of work, such as Head With Horns, 1848-1903, a wooden sculpture used as a background image on the website. Also included are a set of 11 installation shots showing the work in the galleries at MoMA, and three major print series: The Volpini Suite, 1889; Noa Noa (Fragrant Scent), 1893-94; and The Vollard Suite, 1898-99. [DS]


Network Tools

Delete It Later

·http://www.deleteitlater.com/

Have you ever wanted to delete a Facebook or Twitter post after it was published? It can be a good practice but can be tough to remember. Delete It Later allows users to schedule the posting of statuses, updates, and photos along with the option to schedule when the content will be removed. This version is compatible with all operating systems. [KMG]


ReMarkable

·http://remarkable.seedlessapps.com

Educators and professionals will be delighted to learn about SeedlessApps.com?s flagship application, ReMarkable. This handy app allows students or co-workers to submit documents digitally. It's a great way to reduce the use of paper and users can mark all documents and then send them back in pdf format. This particular version is compatible with Apple devices with iOS 6.0 or later. [KMG]


In The News

Ancient underwater volcano, Ka?ena, discovered in Hawai?i

Researchers discover precursor volcano to the island of Oahu
http://www.hawaii.edu/news/article.php?aId=6529

Found! New Underwater Volcano Discovered in Hawaii
http://www.livescience.com/45680-new-hawaii-volcano-discovered-ka-ena.html

Ancient Underwater Volcano Discovered in Hawaii
http://www.reuters.com/article/2014/05/20/us-usa-volcano-hawaii-idUSKBN0E006F20140520

Ka?ena: Scientists Discover New Underwater Volcano on Hawai?i
http://www.sci-news.com/geology/science-kaena-volcano-hawaii-01931.html

Hawaii Volcanoes History
http://www.ohranger.com/hawaii-volcanoes/hawaii-volcanoes-history

Violent Hawaii - Video: Full Episode
http://www.pbs.org/wnet/nature/episodes/violent-hawaii/video-full-episode/1422/

As evidenced by recent geological findings in Hawai?i, even the most ancient history can be rewritten. According to a study published in the Geological Society of America Bulletin, researchers have discovered an ancient underwater volcano that played an important role in the formation of O?ahu. Named Ka?ena, the currently dormant volcano is believed to have started erupting some five million years ago. This discovery complicates the previously held belief that the island was formed by only two volcanoes, Wai?anae and Ko?olau. Ka?ena is believed to be the oldest and shortest of the now three known volcanoes, reaching about 3,000 feet above sea level at its greatest height. John Sinton, lead author of the study and Emeritus Professor of Geology and Geophysics at the University of Hawai?i at Manoa, commented: ?We like to think we know how many Hawaiian volcanoes there are, but what we know about what?s underwater is a huge area of ignorance.? Accordingly, scientists will continue to search for clues to reveal more ancient secrets, such as when Ka?ena became submerged. [CD]

The first link will take readers to the University of Hawai?i system?s news release discussing this recent discovery. The second and third links also report on the underwater find, as written by Becky Oskin in LiveScience and Malia Mattoch McManus in Reuters. Sci-News.com offers another great article highlighting the ancient volcano and includes a very helpful map showing the distribution of O?ahu?s three volcanoes: Ka?ena, Wai?anae, and Ko?olau. OhRanger.com?s examination of Hawai?i Volcanoes National Park is next up, providing a section on the history of Hawai?i, including its volcanic past. Finally, interested readers will find a full episode from the PBS show, Nature, entitled, ?Violent Hawaii.? Not only does the site provide the complete 51-minute long episode, but a corresponding photo essay, two lesson plans, and other educational materials are also available.





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