The Scout Report -- Volume 20, Number 24

The Scout Report -- Volume 20, Number 24

The Scout Report

June 27, 2014 -- Volume 20, Number 24

A Publication of Internet Scout
Computer Sciences Department, University of Wisconsin-Madison




Research and Education

  Paris Architecture and Urbanism
  Mark F. Boyd Collection
  References and Resources for Just-in-Time Teaching
  MacArthur Foundation: Videos
  Digital Humanities Now
  American Museum of Natural History: Educators
  The Global Health Chronicles
  U.S. Department of Justice:Office of Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention

General Interest

  Acquired Tastes
  Global Forest Watch
  Connect With English
  Building Colorado Story by Story: The Sanborn Fire Insurance Maps
  Biodiversity Heritage Library
  NOVA: Bombing Hitler’s Dams
  Abby Williams Hill Collection
  MoMA: Alibis: Sigmar Polke 1963–2010

Network Tools

  CrowdtiltOpen
  Filament

In The News

  Fecal Fossils Reveal Much About the Original Paleo Diet



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Research and Education

Paris Architecture and Urbanism

·http://pudl.princeton.edu/collections/paris

The Princeton University Digital Library has a range of collections that showcase the globe and its many cultures. This particular gem brings together wonderful publications on Paris architecture and urbanism, including a number of works by Austrian-born Jean-Charles Krafft, who is remembered for his detailed documentation of "the most elegant" French neoclassical buildings. During his life he worked tirelessly to confirm these particulars through correspondence with architects and on-site drawings. All told there are nine documents in this collection, including the 1734 Plan of Paris by Louis Bretez. Visitors can explore all of these items in great detail and urbanologists especially will find much to admire within them. [KMG]


Mark F. Boyd Collection

·http://merrick.library.miami.edu/specialCollections/asm0037/

Mark F. Boyd was a physician, researcher, and writer who specialized in tropical medicine. His research on malaria brought him international recognition and the Rockefeller Foundation selected him to conduct research throughout the malarial regions of the western hemisphere. During his long life he collected a range of materials related to field ecology and, in particular, items dealing with Florida, natural history, and medicine. This digital collection from the University of Miami libraries includes maps, newspapers, prints, original documents, and pencil drawings of Key Biscayne. The items here are lovely and they include a historical tour through Coral Gables, a brochure for the Hotel Everglades, and a remarkable brochure that lists apartment rates for the 1937-1938 winter season in Miami. It's a neat pastiche of items and folks with an interest in Florida's history and hospitality will enjoy it immensely.


References and Resources for Just-in-Time Teaching

·http://serc.carleton.edu/introgeo/justintime/references.html

The scholars at the Science Education Resource Center (SERC) at Carleton College have created this set of Just-in-Time Teaching (JiTT) resources designed for the busy educator. Visitors can learn how to use these resources in a range of different disciplines, including biology, chemistry, economics, and the history of photography. Additionally, there is a list of general resources, such as newsletters and articles, that discuss how to implement these practices into the classroom. In the Complementary Pedagogies area visitors can look over helpful "how-tos" in peer instruction, reading question development, and more. Finally, visitors can also sign up to learn when new resources are added to the site. [KMG]


MacArthur Foundation: Videos

·http://www.macfound.org/videos/

The MacArthur Foundation works in a range of thematic policy areas, including arts and culture in Chicago, digital media, affordable housing, and human rights. On the Videos section of this site, interested policy makers and non profit specialists can learn about the foundation’s outreach efforts and its programmatic impact throughout society. There are over 400 videos here, including ones on NatureServe, The Citizen Lab, and The University of Chicago Crime Lab. Interested parties can also look through the videos by geographic location, topic, or program theme. With a variety of topics, viewing these videos is a fine way to get caught up on the foundation’s various activities. [KMG]


Digital Humanities Now

·http://digitalhumanitiesnow.org/

Started in 2009, Digital Humanities Now (DHNow) is "an experimental edited publication that highlights and distributes informally published digital humanities scholarship and resources from the open web." A scrolling set of resources on the homepage features the Editor's Choice, which includes Grasping Technology, Trends in Digital Scholarship Centers, and other helpful topics. Moving on, visitors can look over job announcements in higher education, learn about upcoming conferences, and learn about funding opportunities. The Resources area is a gem offering helpful tools, such as the PressForward Plugin. Finally, a plethora of archived Reports are available, including meditations on Roman mapping, American art history and digital scholarship, and approaches to low-effort crowd sourcing. [KMG]


American Museum of Natural History: Educators

·http://www.amnh.org/learn-teach/educators

What can young people learn from the American Museum of Natural History in New York? Quite a lot, and this helpful website parses out some of the options for immediate classroom consumption. Created with educators in mind, this particular tab of the Learn & Teach portion of the museum’s website is quite helpful for teachers and really anyone with an interest in natural history. Visitors can learn about grade-appropriate resources in each section, along with a mix of bulletins, classroom activities, and essays. It's easy to search through these materials by keyword or name and visitors can also craft their own list of resources for future reference. Information about professional development opportunities, along with links to summer courses and free online seminars, are also offered here. [KMG]


The Global Health Chronicles

·http://www.globalhealthchronicles.org/

How do global diseases get eradicated? It's a fascinating query and one that is explored in-depth on this website sponsored by the Center for Disease Control and Emory University. The site focuses on three diseases (smallpox, Guinea worm, and malaria) to create a portrait of the various resources and individuals that were instrumental in addressing these epidemics. Each section contains oral histories, photographs, documents, and other media. The Malaria Control section is fascinating as it contains a detailed profile of the ways in which the U.S. Public Health Service dealt with this problem in the southeastern states. From here, visitors can click on Media to watch an animated film titled, "Criminal at Large,” and several interesting training films. It's easy to see how these resources might be used in history of science courses or by public health professionals interested in such matters. [KMG]


U.S. Department of Justice:Office of Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention

·http://www.ojjdp.gov/

A part of the U.S. Department of Justice, the Office of Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention (OJJDP) provides research, funding, and statistics on this important corner of the justice system in the United States. On its homepage, visitors can look over sections that include Topics, Funding, Programs, State Contacts, and Statistics. In this last area, visitors can explore the office’s statistical briefing book for information on juvenile populations, along with information on the demographics of youth in residential placement. In Publications, visitors can view all recently published reports in list form, or can easily search for specific publications, such as "Delays in Youth Justice" and "Young Offenders: What Happens and What Should Happen.” Moving on, the Tools area contains links for criminal justice students, information on their performance measures, and funding information. [KMG]


General Interest

Acquired Tastes

·https://www.bostonathenaeum.org/about/publications/selections-acquired-tastes

Located on Beacon Hill, the Boston Athenaeum is a distinguished private membership society that celebrates history and a myriad of other matters. This particular nook of its site brings together selections from its retrospective exhibition entitled, "Acquired Tastes: 200 Years of Collection for the Boston Athenaeum.” The in situ exhibit included paintings, sculptures, maps, prints, photographs, and decorative arts and this complementary site offers visitors insights into the remarkable collection. Highlights include dramatic early views of Boston, a wonderful portrait of John Adams by Gilbert Stuart, and a view of Boston from 1848 as rendered from East Boston. Each view contains detailed bibliographic information, along with a few paragraphs of the significance of each item. Visitors may peruse three dozen items that offer insight into the collecting preferences of the Athenaeum over time. [KMG]


Global Forest Watch

·http://www.globalforestwatch.org/

What is happening in forests right now? You can find out with this amazing resource from the World Resources Institute. This interactive map of the world includes remarkable specialty features that allow users to learn about tree cover loss over time, along with some success stories from around the world. In short the Global Forest Watch (GFW) is a "dynamic online forest monitoring and alert system that empowers people everywhere to better manage forests." After first agreeing to terms of use, visitors to the site can navigate to the Map tab to use a sophisticated set of tools that track tree cover loss and gain from 2000 to the present. Additionally, users can toggle on and off various themes such as "Forest Use" and "Conversation" as they see fit. The Stories area is a real delight as it allows users to learn about the folks who are working to conserve and enhance existing forested areas from Ecuador to Egypt. [KMG]


Connect With English

·http://www.learner.org/series/cwe/

There are many ways to learn another language and Connect with English offers an innovative approach. Through the story of Rebecca Casey, a young woman Bostonian, this multi-part soap opera from the Annenberg Learner site was originally produced by WGBH and it is designed to help non-native speakers learn English. It's a dynamic 48-part series that features family struggles, personal ambition, and a cross-country adventure. Visitors can watch each episode at their leisure all the while practicing English through a range of activities. The site also features a Resources area that offers a variety of websites for learning and practicing English, including complementary items from the BBC, Voice of America, and the New York Times. It's a great resource for ESL teachers and anyone else with an interest in language acquisition. [KMG]


Building Colorado Story by Story: The Sanborn Fire Insurance Maps

·http://libcudl.colorado.edu/sanborn/index.asp

Historians and geographers are always delighted by the promise of fire insurance maps and this collection will only add to the excitement. Made available by the University of Colorado Libraries, this set of Sanborn fire insurance maps consists of 346 maps that “show residential, commercial, and industrial uses of sites, building footprints, potential environmental hazards, and construction details of structures” from 1883 to 1922. First-time visitors will appreciate the broad scope of maps that cover everything from industrial sites in Denver to low-density towns in the northeastern corner of the state. More familiar visitors will love the Advanced Search feature that allows users to look for specific items and Community Tools provides wiki based resources on how to use these maps more efficiently. [KMG]


Biodiversity Heritage Library

·https://archive.org/details/biodiversity

The Biodiversity Heritage Library (BHL) “is a consortium of natural history and botanical libraries that cooperate to digitize and make accessible the legacy literature of biodiversity held in their collections.” Partnering with the Internet Archive, these wonderful items have been brought together for consideration by the general public. All told, there are over 79,000 items in this collection and visitors can browse around by title or author or even look over the Recently Reviewed Items list for suggestions. The Most Downloaded Items list is quite revealing, as it contains some fine items such as "Fish hatchery management" and "Bergey's manual of determinative bacteriology.” Also, visitors can use the tag cloud to get started. One particularly noteworthy item is the rather prodigious volume from the 1870s titled, "Half Hours in the Far North.” It contains fascinating illustrations and observations about Russia, Iceland, and other frozen climes. [KMG]


NOVA: Bombing Hitler’s Dams

·http://www.pbs.org/wgbh/nova/military/bombing-hitler-dams.html

NOVA is well-known for its engaging documentaries and the team delivers once more with “Bombing Hitler’s Dams.” Located within the Military + Espionage section of the NOVA site, this episode follows experts as they recreate the 1943 efforts of the “dam buster” pilots and their one-of-a-kind bouncing bomb. A revolutionary secret weapon, the bomb was used to destroy two German dams, effectively cutting off the water supply to vital arms factories during WWII. The entire episode (nearly 2 hours in length) can be viewed here, accompanied by a complete Transcript of the program and Related Links, such as “D-Day’s Sunken Secrets” and “Escaping a Nazi Prison Camp.” Visitors can also read through the TV Schedule to view Upcoming Broadcasts or Recent Broadcasts that can all be viewed online and are accompanied by related websites, articles, interviews, slideshows, and other great features. [CBD]


Abby Williams Hill Collection

·http://digitalcollections.pugetsound.edu/cdm/landingpage/collection/abbyhill

Housed at the University of Puget Sound, this collection of paintings, sketches, and papers pays tribute to landscape painter Abby Williams Hill (1861-1943) who beautifully captured the American West at the turn of the 20th century. Perhaps best known for her commissioned works for the Great Northern and Northern Pacific railroads, her paintings were exhibited at the St. Louis World’s fair in 1904 and the Lewis and Clark Exposition in Portland in 1905. Visitors unfamiliar with Hill’s work should start with her Biography, then make their way to Featured Searches where they will find seven thematic sections, including National Parks, Portraits, and California. Each item in the collection is accompanied by a detailed description and a handy zoom feature allows for a variety of viewing perspectives. An exemplary digital collection, all items may be shared through a variety of platforms or saved to favorites for return visits. [CBD]


MoMA: Alibis: Sigmar Polke 1963–2010

·http://www.moma.org/interactives/exhibitions/2014/polke/

MoMA presents this retrospective of the vast and varied work of German artist Sigmar Polke (1941-2010), who worked in an "unusually broad range of mediums ... including painting, photography, film, sculpture, drawing, printmaking, television, performance, and stained glass, as well as his constant, highly innovative blurring of the boundaries between these mediums." The exhibition website includes a multi-section chronology that places Polke's work in the context of contemporaries. For example, the German Pop section of the chronology includes works by Polke, Joseph Beuys and Dieter Roth, all related to chocolate. The Consciousness Raisers section features Polke's Telepathic Session II (William Blake–Sigmar Polke), with two canvases connected by strings or cables, along with a Jimi Hendrix poster from 1969, showing similar connectors emerging from Hendrix's head. There is also a set of 32 installation images that depict Polke's work arranged in the galleries at MoMA. [DS]


Network Tools

CrowdtiltOpen

·https://open.crowdtilt.com/

Are you interested in launching your own crowdfunding page for a cause or a new initiative? You can do just that with CrowdtiltOpen. On this site, visitors can learn how various organizations, such as McSweeney's and AdBlock, funded their own new campaigns. Visitors can use a template to easily get started. Additionally, the site offers a helpful FAQ section along with an in-house blog. This version is compatible with all operating systems. [KMG]


Filament

·http://filament.io/

Filament is a collection of apps that can be seamlessly added to websites to enhance the visitor experience. These free apps include Ivy, which allows people to select text on the page and share it via Twitter, Facebook, and so on, and Flare, which gives users the ability to create a customizable social sharing bar to make sharing materials a snap. These various apps are compatible with all operating systems, including Linux. [KMG]


In The News

Fecal Fossils Reveal Much About the Original Paleo Diet

The Neanderthal Meal: A New Perspective Using Faecal Biomarkers
http://www.plosone.org/article/info%3Adoi%2F10.1371%2Fjournal.pone.0101045

Did Neanderthals Eat Plants? The Proof May Be In The Poop
http://www.npr.org/blogs/thesalt/2014/06/26/325813612/did-neanderthals-eat-plants-the-proof-may-be-in-the-poop

What Discovery of Oldest Human Poop Reveals About Neanderthals’ Diet
http://news.nationalgeographic.com/news/2014/06/140625-neanderthal-poop-diet-ancient-science-archaeology/

Ancient Poop Suggests Neanderthals Ate Way More Veggies Than We Thought
http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2014/06/25/neanderthal-poop-vegetable-diet_n_5523040.html

The Real Paleo Diet
http://www.slate.com/blogs/wild_things/2014/06/25/neanderthal_feces_coprolite_study_shows_early_humans_ate_meat_and_vegetables.html

Ice Age Europe:Blog
http://www.ice-age-europe.eu/learn-and-discover/blog.html

Just how balanced was the original paleo diet? Challenging previous categorization of Neanderthals as carnivorous, a recent report in the journal PLOS ONE reveals that they also ate plenty of berries, nuts, and vegetables. Researchers at El Salt, a Neanderthal gathering place in Alicante, Spain, were examining fire pits for chemical traces of fats from cooked meats when they unexpectedly found fossil feces, or coprolites, that dated back 50,000 years. When analyzed, the contents of the coprolites revealed four fats associated with meat consumption as well as two cholesterol-like compounds which come from plants. "They were eating a lot of meat," reported MIT paleoarchaeologist Ainara Sistiaga. "But we believe they were omnivorous." The coprolites also revealed that the Neanderthals, like modern and other ancient peoples, were plagued by parasites. Ancient poop may not be at the top of every archaeologists wish list when beginning a dig, but as these discoveries indicate- its a unique way to learn about the daily lives of our ancient ancestors. [CBD]

The first link will take readers to the official, detailed study that was published in PLOS ONE this Wednesday. Next, Nicholas St. Fleur offers some great food for thought on the discovery in NPR’s blog, The Salt. The third, fourth, and fifth links offer detailed and easily digestible articles on the discovery from National Geographic, the Huffington Post, and Slate respectively. Finally, the Ice Age Europe blog introduces readers to a variety of prehistory musings and links to related institutions, such as the The Neanderthal Museum and The Museum of Human Evolution.





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