The Scout Report -- Volume 20, Number 29

The Scout Report -- Volume 20, Number 29

The Scout Report

August 1, 2014 -- Volume 20, Number 29

A Publication of Internet Scout
Computer Sciences Department, University of Wisconsin-Madison




Research and Education

  National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences (NIEHS)
  The Yale Medicine Thesis Digital Library
  UpNext: The IMLS Blog
  Rarely Seen Richmond
  Abilene Public Library Centennial Series: Oral History Transcripts
  Civil Rights History Project
  The DNA Files
  Massachusetts Historical Society 54th Regiment

General Interest

  My Chicago
  Bertrand Goldberg Archive
  Mass Audubon
  The Swiss Poster Collection
  Physics Frontline
  Victorian Trade Cards
  Minnesota Geological Survey
  MoMA: Inventing Abstraction 1910–1925

Network Tools

  Passible
  Notes for GMail

In the News

  The World War I Centennial



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Research and Education

National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences (NIEHS)

·http://www.niehs.nih.gov/

Located in Research Triangle Park in North Carolina, the National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences (NIEHS) is one of 27 research institutes and centers that make up the National Institutes of Health. The basic goal of the NIEHS is to discover how the environment affects people in order to promote better lives. The Recently Published Research area is a great place to start, followed by the News Releases section where readers will find shorter perspectives on topics such as lead levels in children's blood. Moving on, the Funding Opportunities tab provides great information for scientists and others looking for substantial funding. The general public and journalists will enjoy the Health & Education area as it features brochures and fact sheets, along with an A to Z listing of major health topics, that are related to or affected by environmental exposures. [KMG]


The Yale Medicine Thesis Digital Library

·http://cushing.med.yale.edu/greenstone/cgi-bin/library.cgi?site=localhost&a=p&p=about&c=ymtdl&l=en&w=utf-8site=localhost&a=p&p=about&c=ymtdl&l=en&w=utf-8

The Yale School of Medicine began electronically publishing the full text of student MD theses online back in 2002. This collection showcases this legacy and it's a tremendously valuable source of information. There are over 400 theses available and visitors can search the complete text of each one. Additionally, users can browse the items by subject, author, advisor, and date. The topics covered within these tomes include abdominal aneurysm, salivary gland neoplasms, and women's health. Finally, visitors can craft their own collection of these works via a helpful data management tool that's offered on the site. [KMG]


UpNext: The IMLS Blog

·http://blog.imls.gov/

The Institute of Museum and Library Services (IMLS) has an official blog to let the public know about its various activities, including special grant programs, interviews with subject experts, and much more. First-time visitors can browse through everything from policy commentary on federal changes affecting museums and libraries to interviews with people in charge of digitization projects for the state of Maryland. The archives here date back to August 2011 and visitors can scan over past entries via keyword or focused subject search. Additionally, visitors can learn about the thematic blog post series, which includes "Let's Move! Museums & Gardens" and "From the Bench: Celebrating the Work of Museum Conservators." [KMG]


Rarely Seen Richmond

·http://dig.library.vcu.edu/cdm/landingpage/collection/postcard

Postcards have long been a sentimental memento from places well-known to the completely unknown. Today, they offer a bit of nostalgic throwback but once upon a time millions were sent around the US each year. One figure released by the U.S Post Office for the fiscal year 1907-1908 indicates that over 677 million postcards were mailed in that year alone. This digital collection from the Virginia Commonwealth University brings together over 600 postcard images from Richmond's Gilded Age to the Great Depression. The homepage offers up a mix of remarkable images that document everything from ancient railroad bridges to long gone hotels. The park postcards are quite fun as they reveal neatly manicured grounds that harken back to a certain area of studied green luxury and refined pursuits. [KMG]


Abilene Public Library Centennial Series: Oral History Transcripts

·http://wtda.alc.org/handle/123456789/8

Telling the story of Texas is perhaps best done one town at a time. The West Texas Digital Archives has created this collection of oral history transcripts taken from the Abilene Texas Centennial Celebration. Over the past years, this collection has grown to include lectures and events held at the Abilene Library, so it is now a wonderful potpourri of personal memories celebrating the diversity and difference of this town. Visitors will note that the verbatim transcripts are included here and the collection also contains a file of letters, memos, meeting minutes, and expenses for the programs. Users can look over the Recent Submissions area to find programs and oral histories like "Farming and Ranching in West Texas," "Did the Jazz Age Come to Abilene?," and "Architecture and Development of Abilene." Additionally, users can search the entire repository by author, title, or subject. [KMG]


Civil Rights History Project

·http://www.loc.gov/collection/civil-rights-history-project/about-this-collection/

On May 12, 2009, the U.S. Congress authorized a national initiative by passing the Civil Rights History Project Act of 2009. This law directs the Library of Congress and the Smithsonian Institution's National Museum of African American History and Culture to conduct a survey of existing oral history collections with reference to the Civil Rights Movement. This site brings together a range of interviews conducted since then and participants include lawyers, judges, doctors, farmers, journalists, professors, and others. The materials are divided into two areas: Collections Items and Articles and Essays. In the Articles and Essays area, visitors can look over two thoughtful essays, including "The March on Washington," which offers some thoughtful historical perspective on the events of August 28, 1963. The Collections Items area includes over 50 interviews with leaders including Courtland Cox, Joseph Echols Lowery, and Pete Seeger. [KMG]


The DNA Files

·http://www.dnafiles.org/

The DNA Files are a series of award-winning radio programs hosted by John Hockenberry with consultation from a panel of expert scientists. From 1998 to 2007, the Soundvision team produced nineteen one-hour radio programs that explored the science of genetics, along with its ethical and social implications. On this site, visitors can take an aural trip through their work by listening to the programs in full, exploring the transcripts by keyword, or looking over the Big Ideas section. All of the episodes can be found within the Radio Programs section, including "Designing the Brain," "Minding the Brain," and "Beyond Human." Moving on, the site also includes a Community Outreach area that brings together projects providing resources that help educators use the programs more effectively in the classroom. [KMG]


Massachusetts Historical Society 54th Regiment

·http://www.masshist.org/online/54thregiment/essay.php?entry_id=528

The 54th Massachusetts Volunteer Infantry Regiment was the first military unit consisting of black soldiers to be raised in the North during the Civil War. This remarkable digital collection from the Massachusetts Historical Society is meant to complement a fine in situ exhibit that was on display in 2014. On the site, visitors can peruse selected portraits of the soldiers who made up the unit, learn about their recruitment, and find out how they served during the attack against Fort Wagner on Morris Island in South Carolina. This last set of materials is quite moving as it contains shots of the men in their dress uniforms and their camp. The site is rounded out by a selection of additional images of the volunteers. [KMG]


General Interest

My Chicago

·http://mychicago.wttw.com/

How does one get to know Chicago? It might be through word of mouth, a compelling website, or through a well-known work of fiction by Nelson Algren or Richard Wright. Another way would be to watch a few segments of My Chicago, a program offered by WTTW, the PBS station that serves the Chicagoland area. The program started in 2014 and it features Chicagoans, well-known or other, talking about the neighborhoods where they live and work. Thus far the series has profiled Chicago Tribune writer Mary Schmich, comedian Brian Babylon, and local grocery store owner Bob Mariano. Interested parties can also read an in-house blog and nominate folks they think should be included in a future program. It's a neat idea for those who love cities and it might inspire other series in cities large and small. [KMG]


Bertrand Goldberg Archive

·http://www.artic.edu/aic/collections/artwork/category/73

As one of the foremost Chicago-based architects in the post-WWII period, Bertrand Goldberg designed iconic buildings such as Marina City and the Hillard Homes for the Chicago Housing Authority. The Art Institute of Chicago has crafted this great collection of over 330 images documenting his various accomplishments from the 1940s to the 1980s. Visitors can search the items by keyword or by date and they will find everything from architectural renderings to plans for speculative new urban developments. The proposed buildings are remarkable as well, and they include the 1988 ABC Office Building in New York and a proposed hospitals center for Chicago. Additionally, users can order reproductions of these items for their own collection, if they so desire. [KMG]


Mass Audubon

·http://www.massaudubon.org/

Founded in 1896 by two women with a passion for the protection of birds, Mass Audubon works to protect the nature of Massachusetts for people and wildlife. Its 100,000 members help care for 35,000 acres of conservation land. On its site, visitors can learn about its advocacy work through reports, policy papers, and educational outreach efforts. In the Our Conservation Network area, visitors can learn about Mass audubon's work in land conservation, ecological management, community reach, and climate change. Moving on, the Learn area features information about the Museum of American Bird Art, resources for young conservationists ("EcoKids"), and resources for school groups hoping to pay a visit to some of their land holdings. It's worth nothing that the News & Events area contains blogs, videos, press releases, and details on fun photo contests. [KMG]


The Swiss Poster Collection

·http://luna.library.cmu.edu/luna/servlet/CMUccm~3~3

Crafted and curated by Swiss graphic designer Ruedi Ruegg and Professor Daniel Boyarski as a teaching collection, this collection contains Swiss photos dating from 1970 to 2011. The collection includes works by a range of notables, including Bruhwiler, Kulling, Leupin, Muller-Brockmann, Pfund, and Troxler. The range of colors and designs will surprise and delight casual visitors who might be unfamiliar with these works. All told, there are almost 500 items in this archive, and they can be searched by theme, creator, or decade of creation. First-time visitors might do well to look over the work "Knie Clown Dimitri" by Herbert Leupin. Visitors can save their own favorites to a lightbox for future consideration, which is a rather handy thing to be able to do. [KMG]


Physics Frontline

·http://physicsfrontline.aps.org/

The Physics Frontline blog covers the latest scientific news, analysis, and commentary on the intersection of physics with science policy issues, including innovation, energy, climate change, and nuclear policy. It's an initiative created by the American Physical Society (APS) as a public service and as a way to keep its own members in-the-know about pressing matters. First-time users can get started by looking over the Most Popular area to read some of the most compelling items here submitted on subjects such as nuclear power plant licensing procedures. The blog is updated about once a week and visitors can scroll through previous posts dating back to October 2009. Some recent posts of note include "America Can't Afford to Ignore Science" which offers a clarion call to those concerned about the future of science education. Finally, users can also check out a helpful tag cloud for items of topical interest, such as "advocacy" and "STEM." [KMG]


Victorian Trade Cards

·http://digital.lib.uiowa.edu/cdm/search/collection/tradecards

How can one know the history of the Victorian era? Through its architecture, its writings, its political leaders? Yes, yes, and yes. And a fourth "yes" to the world of trade cards. These quotidian items were used to promote everything from bromides to bicycles and the University of Iowa has this wonderful collection for those curious about such matters. First-time visitors might do well to start by looking over the ads for Clark's Cotton, which includes maudlin and interesting illustrations of boys playing with a kite, colorful birds and bicycle races. It's worth noting that visitors can also search all of the items here by keyword or creator. Visitors can also make their own themed collection for future reference and students of 19th century American culture will find much to enjoy here. The site is rounded out by a site of links to other relevant digital collections, including some from the Library of Congress. [KMG]


Minnesota Geological Survey

·http://conservancy.umn.edu/handle/11299/708

Established in 1872 by the State of Minnesota as part of the University of Minnesota, the Minnesota Geological Survey (MGS) serves the people of Minnesota by providing systematic geoscience information to support the stewardship of water, land, and mineral resources. This rather lovely digital collection brings together a record of all items published by the MGS since its creation. Here, visitors will find documents, reports, maps, and GIS data for online viewing or downloading as well. The thematic collections here include the Aeromagnetic Map Series, the annual reports of the Minnesota Geological and Natural History Survey, and the wonderful county atlas series. Visitors with a penchant for geology, natural history, and geography will find much to enjoy here. [KMG]


MoMA: Inventing Abstraction 1910–1925

·http://www.moma.org/interactives/exhibitions/2012/inventingabstraction/

Starting from the premise that abstraction in art was not "the inspiration of a solitary genius," this website from the Museum of Modern Art (MoMA) features a network map of the connections of over 80 artists. Starting from the alphabetical list of artists, select any artist's name to be taken to their individual entry and their small network. An arrow takes you back to the larger network map. Some artists, highlighted in orange, are network hubs with many of connections going in all directions. These include Tristan Tzara, Alfred Stieglitz, Francis Picabia, and others. Their wider connections were typically built because, in addition to creating art work of their own, these artists also wrote and published, spoke publicly, organized events, and owned galleries. A checklist of the exhibition is provided, along with a downloadable network map. [DS]


Network Tools

Passible

·http://www.passible.com/#overview

This handy app makes storing your passwords quite easy and it's a snap to use. Visitors just need to download it to have access to all of their passwords in one place. It's visually quite compelling and the user interface is quite elegant. This version is compatible with iPhones and iPads running iOS 7.0 or newer. [KMG]


Notes for GMail

·https://chrome.google.com/webstore/detail/notes-for-gmail/mhjceedeiokhkokngbljcgkbfcpnodag

This handy application for adding notes to Gmail conversations and exchanges is quite useful. It works as a web browser application that allows users to annotate emails, create to-do lists, and much more. Additionally, visitors can add reminders with social network integration and pin notes for future reference. This version is compatible with all computers utilizing Google Chrome. [KMG]


In the News

The World War I Centennial

Indiana University commemorating World War I centennial in 2014-15
http://www.newsday.com/news/nation/indiana-university-commemorating-world-war-i-centennial-in-2014-15-1.8932785

European Peace Walk commemorates WWI centennial
http://www.today.com/travel/european-peace-walk-commemorates-wwi-centennial-1D79975858

The Centennial of WWI
http://abcnews.go.com/International/photos/centennial-wwi-24667190/image-wwi-centennial-recalls-terror-trenches-24667492

Sarajevo Celebrates WWI Centennial With Joy And The Macabre
http://www.npr.org/2014/06/28/326406767/sarajevo-celebrates-wwi-centennial-with-joy-and-the-macabre

“One Century Later” panel to discuss enduring influence of Great War
http://worldwar-1centennial.org/

BBC: World War One Centenary
http://www.bbc.co.uk/ww1

On July 28, 1914, one hundred years ago this week, a Yugoslav nationalist shot and killed Archduke Franz Ferdinand, heir to the throne of the Austro-Hungarian Empire, pitching Europe and its colonies into one of the bloodiest conflicts in history. Over the next four years, 60 million Europeans – and some 10 million non-European combatants – were deployed to military service on the Eastern and Western Fronts, as well as in present day Iraq and Saudi Arabia, among other locales. Protracted battles on land and sea witnessed the introduction of scores of new and deadly technologies, including barbed wire, mustard gas, devastating artillery, fighter planes, and steam turbine battle ships. By the time an armistice was declared on November 11, 1918 the war had logged over 37 million casualties, more than a third of them civilians. The devastation stunned the world. Moreover, it shaped the economic, military, and political landscape of the 20th century and beyond. Germany, the most prosperous nation in Europe, was forced to pay humiliating reparations that, at least in part, led to the rise of fascism and the Second World War. Britain’s empire began to crumble. And the United States became a reluctant global power. [CNH]

The first link takes readers to a short Newsday article detailing Indiana University’s commemoration of World War I, with links to pertinent resources from the Newsday Archives, such as an in-depth 1964 article about the assassination. Next, Tanya Mohn offers a touching article about a 342-mile WWI peace walk from Trieste to Vienna. The third site, hosted by ABC News, gathers stunning photos of soldiers and civilians across Europe during wartime, while the fourth showcases NPR’s coverage of the city of Sarajevo, site of the assassination of Franz Ferdinand, on the 100th anniversary of the event. The fifth link, assembled by the United States World War One Centennial Commission, features comprehensive coverage of the war’s effect on the home front. Finally, BBC covers “the Great War” with characteristic depth, featuring comprehensive analyses of how these four years transformed Europe and the world.





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