The Scout Report -- Volume 20, Number 31

The Scout Report -- Volume 20, Number 31

The Scout Report

August 15, 2014 -- Volume 20, Number 31

A Publication of Internet Scout
Computer Sciences Department, University of Wisconsin-Madison




Research and Education

  The Urban Institute: Washington D.C. Region
  Brookings Institution: Social Mobility Memos
  Florida Mental Health Institute
  University of Central Arkansas: Photograph Collections
  Wisconsin Historical Society: Maps and Atlases in our Collections
  Association of College and University Biology Educators (ACUBE)
  Sitka Tribe of Alaska & Sitka Historical Society

General Interest

  Augustine H. Folsom Photographs
  American Planning Association: Podcasts
  Atlases, Maps and Park Plans of Cleveland and Cuyahoga County
  Digital Image Collection (Western Illinois University)
  Before Victoria: Extraordinary Women of the British Romantic Era
  Made in NY
  National Building Museum: Self-Guided Architecture Tours
  Defense.gov: Today in DoD

Network Tools

  Fly
  Readsy

In the News

  Where We Live and How We Got There: A State-by-State Look at Migration in the U.S.



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Research and Education

The Urban Institute: Washington D.C. Region

·http://www.urban.org/communities/dc/index.cfm

The problems faced by the Washington D.C. region are legion and it's good to learn that the Urban Institute has a special research team looking into all of these matters. On this site, visitors can learn about the Institute's work on child well-being, education reform, affordable housing, homelessness, poverty, crime, and health care in these environs. On the homepage, visitors can explore Featured Links for information about the District of Columbia Crime Policy Institute and the NeighborhoodInfo D.C. initiative, which is focused on supporting community organizations, neighborhood leadership, and government. Moving along, the Publications on Washington D.C. Region highlight research reports, news briefs, and more. Recent publications include "Housing Security in the Washington Region" and "Ten Years of Language Access in Washington, D.C." Additionally, visitors may want to sign up to receive the once-monthly published email newsletter. [KMG]


Brookings Institution: Social Mobility Memos

·http://www.brookings.edu/blogs/social-mobility-memos

Social mobility is the process by which individuals and communities are transformed over time. The Brookings Institution is intimately concerned with such matters and this corner of its site brings together many thoughts on such matters. Scholars and occasional guests post regular short pieces here that include "More Education = Delayed Fertility = More Mobility?" and "Does Inequality Matter for Mobility? A Metro View." Visitors are also encouraged to chime in with their own thoughts on each post. A search through all of the past posts is easy and a keyword search is readily available as well. Also, the site includes a link to Blog Roll, which offers users access to creative blogs like Economix, On the Economy, and The Hamilton Project Blog. Finally, users can sign up to receive new social mobility memos via RSS feed or email. [KMG]


Florida Mental Health Institute

·http://home.fmhi.usf.edu/

The mission of the Louis de le Parte Florida Mental Health Institute is "to improve the lives of people with mental, addictive, and developmental disorders through research, training, and education." The Institute was created by the Florida legislature in 1967 and its work encompasses a range of mental health issues coupled with a rigorous outreach program. The materials here are divided into six thematic areas, including Publications/Reports, Research, and State & Local Partners. In the Publications/Reports area, visitors can learn about the Institute’s scholarly activities through its quarterly newsletter and then browse through news briefs and Medicaid studies if so desired. Moving along, the Research area contains updates and reports on work in eight different areas, including autism, child welfare, and veteran's mental health affairs. Finally, the site also includes a section where visitors can contact the Institute to ask questions about its academic work and mission. [KMG]


University of Central Arkansas: Photograph Collections

·http://uca.edu/archives/photograph-collections/

The University of Central Arkansas has thousands of photographs that document the state's rich cultural history. This digital collection offers up online finding aids that cover 32 different thematic collections. While you can't search a comprehensive archive, interested parties can look through the aids, which do in fact contain hundreds of lovely photos. Collections include Black History, Education, Streetscapes, and American Women. Folks with a passion for the built environment should check out the Streetscapes collection first as it contains wonderful images of the Hot Springs business district in 1895, along with images of Little Rock, Conway, and other conurbations. Disasters is another fascinating set of photographs, as is Religion, which offers some perspectives on how worship practices have changed over time. Finally, the Ray Raines collection contains hundreds of photographs by Ray Raines who traveled around the state in the early 20th century convincing the people he met to copy their family photos. [KMG]


Wisconsin Historical Society: Maps and Atlases in our Collections

·http://www.wisconsinhistory.org/Content.aspx?dsNav=N:1166

If you desire to travel around the world with just a few clicks, you may wish to peruse the cornucopia of maps and atlases collected by the Wisconsin Historical Society. All told, there are more than 3,000 maps currently available online with the majority focusing on the Badger State, the Midwest, and the United States more broadly. It is worth noting that approximately 80 percent of the collection predates 1900. A good place to start is with Browse Selected Items, which contains a lovely 1908 map of Madison, Wisconsin and a 1596 map of the Americas based on the geography of Ortelius. Moving on, the Browse More Maps area contains hundreds of additional maps from specific publications, including the Wisconsin Magazine of History and Wisconsin County Histories. Visitors can also just browse around via title, date of creation, and map creator. Perhaps one of the most remarkable maps in this collection is the 1698 map titled, "A New World Between New-Mexico and the Frozen Sea.” While it may not be scientifically accurate in the strictest sense, it is a magical trip through the product of an inventive mind working from conjecture and some basic information about the area. [KMG]


Association of College and University Biology Educators (ACUBE)

·http://www.acube.org/

The Association of College and University Biology Educators (ACUBE) is dedicated to excellence in teaching biology, with most of its members working in small four year colleges and a range of other institutions. On this homepage, visitors can look over materials housed in six primary areas, including Annual Meeting, Bioscene, and Governance. This first area is a great place to learn about the professional opportunities that can be found at this gathering, along with information about how to get involved in the organization. Educators won't want to miss out on the Bioscene link either. Here they can look over this handy peer-reviewed journal that contains articles on the effectiveness of college textbooks and information on how to start an undergraduate science journal club. Additionally, visitors can search the Bioscene archive, which dates back to the first issue in 1975. Finally, visitors can also learn about submitting their own work to this fine journal for science educators and those who are passionate about the subject. [KMG]


Sitka Tribe of Alaska & Sitka Historical Society

·http://vilda.alaska.edu/cdm/.landingpage/collection/cdmg25

This wonderful collection from the University of Alaska pays tribute to the Sitka Tribe of Alaska, the federally recognized government for more than 4,000 tribal citizens primarily of Tlingit, Haida, Aleut, and Tsimpsian Heritage in the Sheet'-Ka area. The site brings together hundreds of items from the Sitka Historical Museum, that work to tell the story of the tribe through photographs, artifacts, and archives related to their history. On the site visitors can learn about Tlingit Paddling Commands, read Twinkle Twinkle Little Star in Tlingit, and listen to the Pledge of Allegiance in Tlingit. Visitors can search through all of the items here at their leisure or they can search via one of the topical headings. Additionally, users can sign up to receive updates for this collection via email or RSS. The site will be of particular interest to historians, scholars of American Indian matters, and those with a general interest in Alaska. [KMG]


General Interest

Augustine H. Folsom Photographs

·https://www.flickr.com/photos/boston_public_library/sets/72157625369428856/#

Augustine H. Folsom owned a carpet factory in late 19th century Boston and he was also a professional photographer. He took hundreds of shots of Boston Public Schools along with many shots of various school activities and his own Roxbury neighborhood. This collection from the Boston Public Library brings together 662 of his photos. Over a 30 year period he documented Boston Latin, Boston English, and other high schools that have since moved buildings and locations in the Hub. What is most remarkable here are the many images of art work created by public school students, such as clay figurines, drawings, paintings, and much more. Visitors can look through these images by keyword or even create their own search. Overall, it provides fascinating insight into one man's curiosity about his city, his community, and his various passions. [KMG]


American Planning Association: Podcasts

·https://www.planning.org/multimedia/podcasts/

Interested in urban design or the work of noted urbanist Jane Jacobs? These topics and much more are addressed in these fine podcasts from the American Planning Association (APA). The podcasts are updated on a semi-regular basis and visitors will note that some of the more recent offerings include conversations with author Tony Hiss about "deep travel" and a panel discussion on streetscape modifications in inner-ring suburbs. Currently the site includes over two dozen podcasts and visitors who work in planning and allied fields will find much to enjoy. Folks with an interest in sustainability should look over the "Green Community" podcast series where they will find conversations about green parking garages, density issues, and crafting meaningful bike share programs. Additionally, there is a place on the site where visitors can pass along suggestions for future podcasts. [KMG]


Atlases, Maps and Park Plans of Cleveland and Cuyahoga County

·http://cdm16014.contentdm.oclc.org/cdm/landingpage/collection/p4014coll24

For visitors with an interest in urbanology, city planning, and the growth and transformation of the Cleveland region, this trove from the Cleveland Public Library is quite a find. It contains over 110 maps, plans, and aerial photos that document the urban area from the early 20th century to the present day. On the homepage, visitors can learn more about the collection and view sample images, such as proposed design plans for new residential subdivisions and planned park improvements. Under the Browse these suggested topics area, visitors will find Sanborn Insurance maps, elaborate aerial photographs of Cuyahoga County from the 1950s, and much more. First-time visitors should look over the fascinating Centennial map of Cleveland, its railroad and park systems, 1895-6, which documents the extensive network of railroads that circled the city at that particular historical moment. [KMG]


Digital Image Collection (Western Illinois University)

·http://collections.carli.illinois.edu/cdm4/index_wiu_digimgc.php?CISOROOT=/wiu_digimgc

Over the past decade, Western Illinois University has worked tirelessly to bring together historic images from west central Illinois for those folks who would like to know more about the region’s culture and history. The materials come from all corners of the Western Illinois University Archives and Special Collections and a special emphasis is placed upon Western Illinois University, the city of Macomb, and McDonough County. Within these digital pages, users can look over newspapers from the late 19th century, images of farm life from the 1920s, town gatherings, and even railroad activity. Visitors will find that while there are no thematic collections offered, it's fairly easy to navigate through the collection. First-time users should check out sample searches such as "fire departments,” "locomotives,” "churches,” and "villages.” [KMG]


Before Victoria: Extraordinary Women of the British Romantic Era

·http://digitalgallery.nypl.org/nypldigital/explore/dgexplore.cfm?topic=arts&col_id=381

This digital gallery from the New York Public Library (NYPL) was prepared for an exhibition of the same name that was presented at NYPL in 2005. It consists primarily of page spreads from printed materials dating from the late 18th and early 19th centuries. Written for and by women, these texts and images cover topics ranging from Adultery to Violence against women, with Girls, Grief, Kissing, and all sorts of other subjects in between. Typical titles include, The young woman's guide to virtue, economy, and happiness, and, Elements of morality, an advice book for children and parents with 50 copperplate illustrations, translated by Mary Wollstonecraft, who was later recognized as an influential early feminist. Individual items can also be viewed on the new NYPL Digital Collection website (http://digitalcollections.nypl.org/items/510d47e0-17d0-a3d9-e040-e00a18064a99 ), which is a bit more user friendly. [DS]


Made in NY

·http://www.nyc.gov/html/film/html/home/home.shtml

Hundreds of movies and television shows are filmed in New York City each year and finding a place to film can be quite daunting. Fortunately, there's the Made in NY website that is designed to make the entire process quite smooth. On this site, visitors can get started by looking over the Location Library where they can look through high-quality filming locations in the five boroughs and also learn about key highlights from each location. In the Quick Links area, visitors can learn about filing a permit, insurance requirements, and incentives for production. The site also has a listing of grants for film production companies and information about hiring production assistants. In the For Fans area, visitors can learn about current film and television productions shooting in New York City or listen to one of the three free walking tours. Narrated by Matthew Modine and Julianna Marguiles, these tours take visitors around lower Manhattan as they learn about the rich and fascinating history of film and television filming over the past century. [KMG]


National Building Museum: Self-Guided Architecture Tours

·http://www.nbm.org/programs-lectures/tours/self-guided-architecture-tours/

The National Building Museum (NBM) tells stories about buildings, their design, and much more via a wonderful collection of exhibits that rotate through their headquarters in Washington, D.C. They also have a bevy of online materials for those who can't make a visit out to the District. On this corner of its site, the NBM has offered up ten different self-guided architecture tours for those folks interested in mid-century Modern style buildings, Arts & Crafts gems, and the world of Greek Revival structures that dot Washington itself. Visitors can click on each of these tours to get more information about each building, including photos, design details, and much more. The Brutalism and Postmodernism tours are standouts and the level of detail is impressive as visitors are treated to tours of the J. Edgar Hoover Building, the Third Church of Christ Scientist, and the Hubert H. Humphrey Building. [KMG]


Defense.gov: Today in DoD

·http://www.defense.gov/today/

Policy analysts, military wonks, and journalists will enjoy this well-developed corner of the U.S. Department of Defense. Here, visitors can learn about each day’s events for the Secretary of Defense and a variety of other military officials. Moving down the page, one can wander through areas that include Speeches, News/Casualty Releases, Press Advisories, and Transcripts. This last area contains archived transcripts of public hearings, meetings, and the like. Interested parties can search them by date and they may also download them for their offline viewing. The News Photos area contains hundreds of photos from media events, public hearings, and much more. Visitors will also find the Department of Defense's Video News segments, which include testimony from Department of Defense officials and briefings on new initiatives. [KMG]


Network Tools

Fly

·http://www.editonthefly.com/

Fly is a seamless way to edit videos quickly and with little fuss, all from your iPhone. This application can be used to make simple edits, dissolve transitions, add split screens, and much more. Additionally, users can videos to four different devices. The site contains several helpful demos and a thorough FAQ area. This version is compatible with all devices running iOS 7.0 and newer. [KMG]


Readsy

·http://www.readsy.co/

Readsy is a handy tool that gives users the ability to skim large amounts of text by focusing their eyes on one word at a time. All visitors have to do is enter some text or a URL and Readsy will do the rest. It's interesting to think about how this might work for different groups, and while it's not for everyone, it's worth a close look. This particular version is compatible with all operating systems. [KMG]


In the News

Where We Live and How We Got There: A State-by-State Look at Migration in the U.S.

Where We Came From, State by State
http://www.nytimes.com/interactive/2014/08/13/upshot/where-people-in-each-state-were-born.html

New Upshot Tool Provides Historical Look at Migration
http://taxfoundation.org/blog/new-upshot-tool-provides-historical-look-migration

Migration Study Shows Illinois Residents Bolt State For Warm Climates
http://chicago.cbslocal.com/2014/08/15/migration-study-shows-illinois-residents-bolt-state-for-warm-climates/?utm_medium=VPH&utm_source=topvph_news&utm_campaign=577413

American Migration [Interactive Map]
http://www.forbes.com/special-report/2011/migration.html

A State-by-State Look at Where Each Generation Lives
http://www.governing.com/topics/urban/gov-generational-population-data-maps-by-state.html

American Migrations
http://americanmigrations.uic.edu

Foreign immigration is all over the news these days, but domestic migration has also popped up as a topic of interest. On Thursday, the New York Times’ Upshot blog tapped into this more local facet of demographic change when it released a series of interactive charts documenting domestic migration since the turn of the twentieth century. Created by Gregor Aisch, Rob Gebeloff, and Kevin Quealy, the charts use census data to highlight what share of each state’s population was born in-state, abroad, or in certain states of note. As a result, each migration pattern pinpoints trends in movement and hints at the dynamism of a state’s economy, the influence of educational systems, and even moments of cultural renaissance. Some notable trends include California’s exodus of native-born Californians, the South’s influx of in-migration (both national and international), and the staying power of the Mid-West. [CBD]

The first link features the Upshot’s great interactive series. Visitors are encouraged to take a look at any and all states of interest as they reveal much about the history, economy, and social trends in each area. The second link will take visitors to a detailed look at these charts from The Tax Policy Blog’s Lyman Stone, and visitors will find CBS Chicago’s examination of exactly what these findings say about Illinois via the third link. An equally exciting map of American migration patterns is accessible through the fourth link. Here, Forbes takes a look at inbound/outbound migration patterns by county. Changing course slightly, the fifth link features a state-by-state look at where each generation lives, courtesy of Governing.com, and the final link will take interested readers to the American Migrations Project, an NSF-funded initiative for teaching and research about African American and Latino migrations throughout American history.





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