The Scout Report -- Volume 21, Number 22

The Scout Report -- Volume 21, Number 22

The Scout Report

June 12, 2015 -- Volume 21, Number 22

A Publication of Internet Scout
Computer Sciences Department, University of Wisconsin-Madison




Research and Education

  The Ronald Reagan Presidential Foundation & Library
  Thirty Meter Telescope
  Jet Propulsion Lab: Infographics
  Rich Schools, Poor Students: Tapping Large University Endowments to Improve Student Outcomes (PDF)
  Essential Science for Teachers: Earth & Space Science
  STEMblog
  The Woodman Diary

General Interest

  Columbia Journalism Review: Innovations
  An American Family Grows in Brooklyn
  San Francisco Art Enthusiast
  BBC Radio 4: The World at One
  PEN/Faulkner Foundation
  White House Live
  Urban Natural Resources Stewardship
  Artsy

Network Tools

  StudyBlue
  1Password

In the News

  Library of Congress Appoints Juan Felipe Herrera as 21st U.S. Poet Laureate



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Research and Education

The Ronald Reagan Presidential Foundation & Library

·http://www.reaganfoundation.org/

The Ronald Reagan Presidential Foundation & Library seeks to maintain the legacy of the 40th president of the United States. While the fullest experience is open to those who visit the Simi Valley institution in person, there is a great deal available online. For instance, under the Ronald Reagan tab, interested readers will find information about the president's Life & Times, his reputation as The Great Communicator, excerpts from his White House Diary, and other interesting tidbits. There are also a number of helpful lesson plans and resources within the Education section of the site. One especially thorough and interesting resource examines Executive Power in Times of Crisis. Designed for secondary students, this lesson uses primary source documents, images, and cartoons as a way to understand the implications of the use of executive power within certain historical contexts. [CNH]


Thirty Meter Telescope

·http://www.tmt.org/

Construction has finally started on the Thirty Meter Telescope (TMT), a project that has been in planning and fundraising phases for several years. Upon completion, the sky-peering instrument will be "the most advanced and powerful optical telescope on Earth." There is much to glean about the project from this website. Readers may like to read the History of the TMT project or browse Outreach & Education, both found within the About TMT section. The News Center is another interesting component of the site and features Press Releases, Feature Stories, the TMT Segments Newsletter, and Podcasts. Readers looking for detailed information about The Telescope, Site Information, and Instruments will enjoy the Observatory section, while Multimedia offers some beautiful animations of the telescope-to-be, as well as photographs, and video interviews with scientists who are looking forward to using the TMT to unlock the secrets of the universe. [CNH]


Jet Propulsion Lab: Infographics

·http://www.jpl.nasa.gov/infographics/

The Jet Propulsion Lab at NASA has an entire section of its site dedicated to lovely and informative infographics for use by students, teachers, and enthusiasts alike. The existing collection includes dozens of these beautiful graphics designed to introduce readers to diverse aspects of space and space science, everything from the Anatomy of an Ion Engine to Mars Quick Facts. The Featured Infographics section allows users to search by over a dozen categories, including Sun, Mercury, Earth, Solar System, Rovers & Landers, and more. The Explore section encourages browsing as well as searching. But perhaps most exciting of all is the Create section, where visitors can try their hand at creating infographics of their own through a guided three-step process. Budding designers can download ?images, 3-D models, fact sheets, and other data? from the existing collection and gather inspiration from other creators before assembling their own infographic and uploading for inclusion in the site. [EB]


Rich Schools, Poor Students: Tapping Large University Endowments to Improve Student Outcomes (PDF)

·http://nexusresearch.org/reports/Rich_Schools_Poor_Students.pdf

The Nexus Research & Policy Center, an independent, not-for-profit with an eye on promoting access to higher education, produced an excellent report on how to leverage large university endowments toward assisting low-income students in their graduation goals. Available here as a downloadable PDF, the study argues that a few "private" nonprofit colleges have amassed staggering endowments (for instance, Harvard currently enjoys an endowment of over $32 billion). These institutions don't pay taxes on their endowments or their substantial property holdings. The authors argue that two steps should be taken: first, make these hidden subsidies public; second, tax large endowments and put the money toward programs that keep low- and middle-income students in school. This report is a must read for anyone interested in higher education policy. [CNH]


Essential Science for Teachers: Earth & Space Science

·https://www.learner.org/courses/essential/earthspace/index.html

This resource from Annenberg Learner is a welcome find for K-6 educators looking to boost their content knowledge in Earth and Space Science. Over eight sessions, participants are provided the opportunity to become better informed of students' science conceptions and develop new understandings of how this content can be integrated into classrooms. After browsing the Homepage, Course Overview, and Course Structure, interested readers can dive right in. Each Session provides helpful information, via videos, text, and visuals, on a range of topics, such as the Earth's Solid Membrane: Soil (Session 1) and a Journey to the Earth's Interior (session 3). Along the way, readers may click on A Closer Look, Children's Ideas, and Featured Classroom links to fill out the experience. While this site is designed for classroom teachers, the information and presentation make it interesting for anyone who wants to refresh their basic knowledge of our planet. [CNH]


STEMblog

·http://blog.stemconnector.org

STEMconnector is both a resource and a service that is designed ?to link those advocating science, technology, engineering, and math (STEM) education across disciplines and distances.? It seeks to connect diverse educators, professionals, and government officials together based on a love of applied science. The STEMblog, a project of STEMconnector, is updated regularly and focuses its energies on the relationship between business and STEM subjects. Recent articles, for example, have alerted readers to corporate-sponsored prizes for high school science teachers, a recognition of National Engineers Week, and the math behind a new Android app. For readers who are looking to make connections between STEM subjects and industry partners, the STEMblog is an informative site to check back on regularly. [CNH]


The Woodman Diary

·http://dhprojects.maynoothuniversity.ie/woodman/

Graduate students in the humanities rarely get to see the fruits of their research developed into a highly acclaimed, interactive website. However, under the supervision of professor Susan Schreibman, students at Maynooth University have done just that, offering readers a digitized and fully transcribed edition of an Irish First World War soldier?s diary. The diary itself belonged to Albert ?Bert? Woodman, a telegrapher and signaler in the Royal Engineers who was stationed in Dunkirk during the First World War. From January 1918 to November 1918, Woodman kept a fascinating record of his day-to-day life behind the front lines of the Wester Front, intending it for his wife, Nellie, should anything happen to him. There are 274 entries here for readers to explore, accompanied by high-quality digital images, video interviews, background information on the Woodman family, and musings from students about the compiling, research, and writing processes. The Woodman Diary not only provides a wonderful primary source on the Great War, it brings the theory and practice of digital humanities scholarship to life. [CBD]


General Interest

Columbia Journalism Review: Innovations

·http://www.cjr.org/innovations/

Founded in 1961, the Columbia Journalism Review offers a mix of reporting, analysis, and commentary focused on the evolution of the art and business of media. The Innovations section of the magazine publishes content concerning the forefront of continually transforming print, television, and Internet media, with articles that broach such topics as whether the New York Times will go printless, how journalists are using Twitter, and the interrelationship between livestreaming media and political journalism. Articles range in length from shorter pieces of 700 words to more in-depth explorations of 3,000 words or more. In a particularly interesting article, "How scientists are annotating climate change," journalist Laura Dattaro looks at how scientists are wading into the media debate about climate change by analyzing and commenting on news reports. This site is a must read for anyone interested in analysis of the media. [CNH]


An American Family Grows in Brooklyn

·http://www.brooklynhistory.org/exhibitions/lefferts/

This phenomenal site from the Brooklyn Historical Society traces the early history of this American city through the narrative of a single family. In 1661, Dutchman Pieter Janse Hagewout immigrated to the burgeoning colonies and purchased land in what came to be known as King's County. Over the decades, his descendants, the Lefferts, amassed land, wealth, and power, transforming the fertile soil into a booming agricultural hub, and eventually overseeing the transition of the space into into the bustling urban center that is present-day Brooklyn. This site provides a wealth of information. Readers may like to begin with The Lefferts Story, where they may read about Brooklyn's Dutch Frontier, the Lefferts Clan, Marriage and Family, and other topics. The site also boasts a fascinating Image Gallery, with death certificates, early maps of Brooklyn, snapshots of 19th century farms, and other treasures. [CNH]


San Francisco Art Enthusiast

·http://sfartenthusiast.com/

Not just for San Franciscans, this online magazine features the latest news about the world of contemporary art as it is unfolding. Via interviews, gallery reviews, photo features, information about museums, and more, the San Francisco Art Enthusiast highlights the local art scene as well as larger trans-national art trends. For instance, the review of Mexico-City based artist Curiot (a.k.a. Favio Martinez) reveals not only what is breaking in the arts scene in Northern California, but explicates the surrealist, quasi-mythical imagination of a Mexican acrylics painter working at the center of a global movement. Likewise, an interview with Jillian Bruschera sheds light on a paper making studio that is traveling around the country. This is a wonderful resource for both artists and art enthusiasts looking to celebrate and increase awareness of the unique art scene thriving in the San Francisco Bay Area. [CNH]


BBC Radio 4: The World at One

·http://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/b006qptc

The World at One has been a mainstay on BBC Radio for over 50 years. Now readers can access hundreds of its programs directly from their home computers or handheld devices. Recent episodes have covered China?s plans to create an international finance organization, debate over the UK?s military spending, and commentary on extremism on the Isles. While the World at One clearly focuses on Great Britain?s place in the world, it also presents intelligent analysis of issues that effect the United States, Europe, and the entire international community. Readers may like to scroll through the Episodes and Clips sections to see what looks interesting. The well resourced Galleries are another staple of the site and feature photo journalism from around the world. [CNH]


PEN/Faulkner Foundation

·http://www.penfaulkner.org/

The PEN/Faulkner Award for Fiction is one of the most prestigious prizes in American letters. It has been known to launch careers and help books that would otherwise languish on the shelves. While there are a few interesting tidbits on the PEN/Faulkner website (News, for instance, provides interesting links to coverage of books, authors, and the awards), the real gem of the site is the PEN/Faulkner Podcast Series, located within Reading Series, where authors get together and talk about writing, writers, literature, and the world of publishing. With episodes published most months, the site boasts an exciting backlog. Recent conversations have included novelist, filmmaker, and Zen Buddhist Priest, Ruth Ozeki, whose latest novel was shortlisted for the Man Booker Prize, and Claire Vaye Watkins, who is a 2014 Guggenheim Fellow and was named one of the 5 Best Writers Under 35 by the National Book Foundation. [CNH]


White House Live

·https://www.whitehouse.gov/live

If you have ever wondered what goes on in and around the White House on a daily basis, White House Live can provide some answers. Everyday the updating schedule includes two parts: Tune In Today, for listenable and watchable events happening live; and Mark Your Calendar, for upcoming events to keep on your radar. For instance, on the day of this writing, readers could watch the White House Convening on Trafficking and Child Welfare, or view a Press Briefing by Press Secretary Josh Earnest. White House Live also features links to other resources, such as The Most Shareable Budget in History and a link to information about Precision Medicine. [CNH]


Urban Natural Resources Stewardship

·http://www.nrs.fs.fed.us/urban/

Over the past 100 years, more and more of the U.S. population has moved into urban areas. Currently, more than 80 percent of Americans live in or near a city. The Northern Research Station (NRS), a division of the U.S. Forest Service, seeks to keep cities and suburbs livable by ensuring that trees, parks, greenways, rivers, and lake fronts remain elements of the "urban forest." In addition to information about the NRS' Urban Natural Resources Stewardship efforts, this website includes a list of Science Topics, each dedicated to a unique aspect of land use in urban areas. For instance, "Neighborhood quality of life" links to information about how trees increase social well-being and an article outlining the group's research on what attracts and repels visitors to urban recreation areas. In addition, the site links out to other Research Themes of the NRS, such as Sustaining Forests and Providing Clean Air and Water. [CNH]


Artsy

·https://www.artsy.net/

In collaboration with a wide range of prominent museums, galleries, and individual artists, Artsy provides resources for anyone who is interested in collecting and learning about fine art. Artsy's mission statement is "to make all the world's art accessible to anyone with an Internet connection." The site focuses on access; there are over 40,000 artists to search from, each with numerous high-resolution images of their artwork, some of which are freely downloadable for educational use. Visitors should look for the "Download Image" button to check if an image can be downloaded. However, even non-downloadable images are a high enough resolution to project in a classroom. Artsy also provides lesson plans and artist biographies. Resources for would-be art collectors abound, including online bidding in auctions, as well as the ability to follow favorite artists and preview art gallery and museum exhibitions, as well as art fairs. [DS]


Network Tools

StudyBlue

·https://www.studyblue.com/

Tech-savvy educators are increasingly looking for more and better online tools to help their students learn. Enter StudyBlue, a free service that is designed to help students learn collaboratively. As a flashcard based resource, it allows users to create, share, and view the flashcards of others, using text, audio, and images. There are thousands of viewable flashcards already on the site that cover dozens of different subjects. In addition, teachers can create their own virtual classes, then add and track students as they access information, create or modify flashcards, and even take online quizzes. User accounts can be set up by using Facebook, Google, or an email address. [CNH]


1Password

·https://agilebits.com/onepassword

Between Facebook, Twitter, Amazon, Paypal, three different email accounts, bank accounts, and a host of other password protected web sites, it?s often difficult to remember which password you used for which web service. 1Password has the answer; it secures passwords and saves them behind a locked browser extension. Users can access them easily, needing only a single password to open the treasure chest. Best of all, 1Password automatically creates new passwords for new sites, and fills in all passwords to known sites automatically. The 1Password extension and app are supported across a variety of platforms, including Mac, Windows, iOS, and Android. [CNH]


In the News

Library of Congress Appoints Juan Felipe Herrera as 21st U.S. Poet Laureate

First Hispanic Poet Laureate Appointed by Library of Congress
http://www.newsweek.com/first-hispanic-poet-laureate-appointed-library-congress-341673

Juan Felipe Herrera becomes first Mexican American U.S. poet laureate
http://www.washingtonpost.com/entertainment/books/juan-felipe-herrera-becomes-first-hispanic-american-us-poet-laureate/2015/06/09/12de51b8-0eb0-11e5-adec-e82f8395c032_story.html

Juan Felipe Herrera Appointed Poet Laureate
http://reviews.libraryjournal.com/2015/06/prepub/juan-felipe-herrera-appointed-poet-laureate/

Juan Felipe Herrera, Poet Laureate With a Working-Class Voice Meant to Be Spoken
http://www.nytimes.com/2015/06/10/books/juan-felipe-herrera-poet-laureate-with-a-working-class-voice-meant-to-be-spoken.html?_r=0

U.S. poet laureate Juan Felipe Herrera on the art of poetry
http://www.latimes.com/books/jacketcopy/la-et-jc-poet-laureate-juan-felipe-herrera-the-art-of-poetry-20150610-story.html

Juan Felipe Herrera, Current Poet Laureate
http://www.loc.gov/poetry/laureate.html

On Wednesday, the Library of Congress announced the appointment of Juan Felipe Herrera as the 21st U.S. Poet Laureate. The son of migrant farm workers in California, Herrera, 66, is the first Latino poet to hold the year-long post and brings an extraordinarily diverse artistic background to the position. Over the course of his career, he has written several highly acclaimed poetry collections, including Half the World in Light: New and Selected Poems (2008). He is the winner of the National Book Critics Circle Award, the PEN USA National Poetry Award, and the International Latino Book Award, among numerous other honors. As stated by Dana Gioia, former chairman of the National Endowment for the Arts, Herrera is ?the first U.S. Laureate whose work has emerged from the new oral traditions that have been transforming American poetry over the past quarter-century. He can write traditional poems for the page, but many of his poems are designed primarily for spoken delivery. His work is performative, and communal. In this sense, Herrera speaks powerfully to younger poets and audiences.? Indeed, as an activist poet, Herrera has expressed a similar focus behind his art: ?The times now seem to be evolving with voices of color. All voices are important, and yet it seems that people of color have a lot to say, particularly if you look through the poetry of young people - a lot of questions and a lot of concerns about immigration and security issues, you name it, big questions. All this is swirling in the air.? [CBD]

Newsweek, the Washington Post, and Library Journal all reported on the appointment of Juan Felipe Herrera this week, with write-ups available via the first three links listed above. The fourth link will take readers to a piece by Dwight Garner of the New York Times, in which he eloquently details the best way to consume Herrera?s poetry - as spoken word. Next up, the LA Times presents the Poet Laureate?s thoughts on his work, in his own words, while the final link will take readers to a closer look at the position of Poet Laureate, courtesy of the Library of Congress. Here, readers will find information about Juan Felipe Herrera, as well as details About the Position, a listing of Past Poets Laureate, and Past Poet Laureate Projects. While the position has become largely ceremonial over the years, Laureates are free to use the pulpit at the Library of Congress to pursue whatever initiatives they like. Herrera already seems to know what that purpose will be: to urge more young Latino students to write, read, and benefit from the Library of Congress' resources, as well as help "close the gap of knowing about and hearing about our Latino communities in terms of literature, in terms of writing."





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