The Scout Report -- Volume 26, Number 11

The Scout Report -- Volume 26, Number 11
March 27, 2020
Volume 26, Number 11

General Interest

Theme: Science of Food Podcasts

Revisited

In the News

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General Interest

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Figures of Speech
Social studies

"Unless you have dialogue, unless you open the walls of dialogue, you can never reach to change people's opinion." This excerpt from "The Hope Speech," one of the many speeches featured on Figures of Speech, encompasses the organization's work. By recreating speeches from revolutionary orators and leaders such as Angela Davis and Nelson Mandela, Figures of Speech "uses the power of performance to explore big political and social ideas." Under the Speeches tab, users can browse the 15 videos available as of this issue. Most are around ten minutes in length and feature a variety of actors recreating famous works and words. The group also has a Young Leaders section dedicated to speeches by "young people aged 16-25 with big ideas, something vital to say about the world we live in and the desire to influence positive change." In addition to watching the speeches, readers may want to check out the Reactions section, which brings together individuals to discuss and respond to some of the key speeches featured on the site. On the Explore page, users can browse additional Language & Rhetoric resources, as well resources (including speech transcripts) specific to many of the orators featured. Figures of Speech is a project of Almeida Theatre in London and is directed by Anthony Almeida. [EMB]

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Living Proof: Stories of Resilience Along the Mathematical Journey
Mathematics

For some, the thought of calculating derivatives or identifying isosceles triangles brings on a surge of joy, for others, a surge of dread. Regardless of whether or not you identify as a "math person," Living Proof: Stories of Resilience Along the Mathematical Journey is on a mission to disprove such labels, suggesting that "mathematical thinking is a fundamental part of every human's intellectual capacity." The book was published in 2019 by the American Mathematical Society and the Mathematical Association of America and is accessible in downloadable PDF form at the link above. Living Proof exists to showcase that "the ability to succeed in a mathematical program should not be hindered by a person's gender, race, sexuality, upbringing, culture, socio-economic status, educational background, or any other attribute." Throughout its four sections, professors, field consultants, and mathematicians share stories of success and struggle, with the hope of both celebrating and continuing to cultivate diversity in the field. They also provide insights on the wide range of mathematical careers available. The book was edited by Allison K. Henrich (Seattle University), Emille D. Lawrence (University of San Francisco), Matthew A. Pons (North Central College), and David G. Taylor (Roanoke College). [EMB]

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National Gallery of Art: Uncovering America
Arts

From the Lessons and Activities section of the US National Gallery of Art (NGA) website's Education Division (featured in the 11-19-1999 Scout Report), Uncovering America provides K-12 teachers with a set of thematic modules featuring NGA works of art that focus on "the intersection of art and American identity and history," and can be used to teach topics such as Activism and Protest, Manifest Destiny and the West, Transportation, and Gordon Parks Photographs. The eleven modules include introductory essays, image sets with background information about each work, suggested questions, and classroom activities. For example, a look into the Immigration and Displacement module shows images such as a 1907 photograph by Alfred Stieglitz that depicts the steerage area of a ship traveling from the United States to Bremen, Germany. Associated questions ask students to "Look closely at the people in this photograph and try putting yourself in their shoes. What do you imagine their travels might have been like?" The collection shows "a wide range of view[points] on immigration," over time, since some artists in this module are working in the 20th and 21st centuries, like Arshile Gorky, Romare Beardon, Dorothea Lange, or Kara Walker, while others represent the 18th and 19th centuries, such as John Singleton Copley or George Catlin. [DS]

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Journalist's Resource: Syllabi
Language Arts

Journalism educators and enthusiasts looking for resources to teach or self-study may enjoy the Syllabi Archives from Journalist's Resource. This "open-access online reference desk" is a collaboration between the Shorenstein Center on Media, Politics and Public Policy (a branch of Harvard's Kennedy School) and the Carnegie-Knight Initiative (a branch of the John S. and James L. Knight Foundation, created to "promote excellence in journalism and the success of the communities in which they worked,"). As of this write-up, the collection contains syllabi for 12 different courses, covering topics such as "Feature writing: Crafting research-based stories with character, development and a structural arc" and "Digital media and society: Covering social media, technology and a networked world." After clicking on a class of interest, users will be guided through course learning objectives, suggested readings, assignments, and a weekly breakdown by topic. While the Syllabi Archives section hasn't been updated since 2017, the resource as a whole seeks to "curate, summarize, and contextualize high-quality research on newsy public policy topics," and includes several other timely tips and guides that are frequently refreshed. [EMB]

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Wildlife Thailand
Science

Skip the plane ticket: Exploring Thailand's beautiful landscapes and diverse flora and fauna is now just a click away with Wildlife Thailand. This resource serves as "a community website for sharing information, photographs, and experiences on Thailand's wildlife, nature and protected areas in order to help everyone have the opportunity to explore Thailand's outstanding wildlife and National Parks." On the Forum page, readers can browse posts on topics such as "Wildlife Sanctuaries in Thailand" and "Birds and Birding," and those interested in contributing can create a free account to do so. Topical posts can also be found under the Articles tab. Selecting the All Categories sub-section, users will see a full list of the subjects available. If you find yourself wondering how a yellow throated marten behaves in the wild, or want to watch Thailand's arthropods spar and spawn, look no further than the website's video gallery (found under the Galleries tab). The Galleries section also links to photography collections from the Thailand Wildlife Collective, "a personal conservation photography endeavor by four Thailand based photographers to assist in facilitating communication and public awareness in Thailand through wildlife imagery." [EMB]

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Theme: Science of Food Podcasts

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Foodie Pharmacology
Science

Dr. Cassandra Quave, a professor and researcher studying botanical science, invites "flavor connoisseurs," "science geeks," and foodies of all kinds to join her on an adventure as she "explores the world of the food-medicine continuum," with Foodie Pharmacology. The podcast combines "history, medicine, cuisine, and molecules," and brings aboard guests to discuss age old questions (for example, "Can an apple a day keep the doctor away?" in Episode 21) and current science hot-topics (for example, "Eating for Peak Fitness" in Episode 33). Other recent topics include the history of antibiotics (Episode 32) and the evolutionary biology interlaced in our eating habits (Episode 30). Following the above link, readers will find more than 35 episodes (as of this write-up), as well as biographies of each guest on that installment of the podcast. Most episodes are around an hour long and are also available on Apple Podcasts and Soundcloud. Readers looking for more resources from Dr. Quave should check out the link to her research group's website (accessible from the About page), which connects readers to an assortment of research articles and projects. [EMB]

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Milk the Funk: The Podcast
Science

What beverage is created by processes including wort souring, Brettanomyces fermentation, and turbid mashing? If you guessed beer, you are right! Those interested in learning how beer is brewed may enjoy Milk the Funk: The Podcast. Launched in 2013 as Wiki page and Facebook pages for home-brewing enthusiasts, Milk the Funk has since become "a communal authority on alternative yeast and bacteria fermentation with an emphasis in alternative brewing techniques." Due to the large following garnered by the pages, the group expanded their offerings to include a podcast in 2017. The Milk the Funk: The Podcast features "the most up to date discussion on the science and techniques of mixed fermentation" (think, Microbiology: The Miller Lite edition). Listeners learn from experts in the field, including researchers, brewers, and even "beer historians," who cover topics such as brewing yeasts and fermentation techniques. The podcast is hosted by Art Whitaker, Dan Pixley, and Dr. Matt Humbard, all of whom have impressive experience in the brewing industry. As of this write-up, the team has released 16 episodes, which vary in length from about 20 minutes to 2 hours. These podcast can be streamed at the link above and is also available on Apple Podcasts, Google Play, and Stitcher. [EMB]

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Serving Up Science
Science

Billed as "the series all about food," Serving Up Science brings you sweet, savory, and scientific, usually in under 10 minutes. Science writer Sheril Kirshenbaum and host of WKAR-FM public radio Karel Vega co-host the podcast, where they combine their loves of history and food. The pair explores everything from the environmental impact of meal kit delivery services (in the November 28, 2018 episode) to the science behind stress snacking (in the December 11, 2019 episode), guided by the question: "Food is the language everyone speaks, but do we really understand it?" Listeners will gain a unique blend of knowledge, from a happier breakfast choice (as the podcast informs, "warm oatmeal boosts levels of serotonin") to insights on the Irish folktale that led to the tradition of pumpkin carving (in the October 23, 2019 episode). Listeners can stream Serving Up Science at the link above, or on Apple Podcasts. Fans of the series may enjoy Kirshenbaum's corresponding videos (under the same name) available on PBS Video and the PBS app. These cooking demonstrations are sure to make your mouth water, so watch with a snack in hand. [EMB]

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The Food Chain
Social studies

Tune into The Food Chain for mouth-watering and mind-boggling insights on all things food and food systems. With more than 200 episodes as of this write-up, the podcast has explored food through several lenses, from "the business, science, and cultural significance of food," to "what it takes to put food on your plate." For example, the "How to tell a food story" episode weighs in on "how food can be used as a narrative device," while "The tipping point" episode explores cultural and psychological effects on "tipping norms." The reoccurring episode theme "My Life in 5 Dishes" features culinary celebrities (including Gordon Ramsay and Marcus Samuelsson) who invite listeners into their lives through their plates, "shar[ing] their thoughts on the five dishes that mean the most to them." While the topics covered are wide-ranging, the length is manageable; most episodes are less than 30 minutes long, the perfect listen for your lunch break. The Food Chain is a project of BBC World Service and can be found on BBC's website (at the link above), as well as popular podcast platforms such as Apple Podcasts and Spotify. [EMB]

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Food Micro Minutes
Science

Launched by students in Cornell University's Food Science Department, Food Micro Minutes "connect[s] new literature in Food Microbiology with current and common knowledge." The episodes transform academic studies and scientific concepts into palatable content for those less familiar with the field of microbiology. For example, listeners will learn about the longstanding rivalry between plants and bacteria in the "Produce Safety" installment (Season 2, Episode 7) and explore the chemical reactions in their favorite sweets in the "Sweeteners!" installment (Season 2, Episode 8). Whether you're curious about "genetically engineered cheese cultures" or prefer a dairy-free approach, there's an episode for you, too (see the "Lunch Time: From Genetically Engineered Cheese Cultures to Lab Grown Beef Burgers" and "From Veggies to Vegans" episodes respectively). On the website's Home page, readers will find a blog roll of the 17 episodes (as of this write-up) released since the podcast's March 2018 unveiling. Each entry contains the audio file, as well as links to any papers discussed in each. Those looking for a simple place to begin can also find the first season archived under Episodes, where they can listen to audio of a brief welcome and the season's nine installments. In addition to the link above, readers can find the podcast on iTunes, Buzzsprout, Player FM, and Stitcher. [EMB]

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Revisited

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Gastropod
Science

Since its feature in the 08-28-2015 Scout Report, Gastropod (now on its 14th season) continues to produce fascinating bi-weekly content, covering topics ranging from "the Queen of Kiwi" (see the December 17, 2019 episode) to the history of Gin and Tonics (see the February 11, 2020 episode).

As the site notes, "Gastropod looks at food through the lens of science and history." In each episode of this gastronomic podcast, co-hosts Cynthia Graber and Nicola Twilley examine historical precedents and groundbreaking science of a unique culinary event, "from aquaculture to ancient feasts, from cutlery to chile peppers, and from microbes to Malbec." They interview experts and chefs, visit labs and kitchens and archaeology digs, and generally have a wonderful time showing listeners the ins and outs of the what and how of food today. Episodes tend to run about half an hour in length, and each is accompanied by a well written article and informative Episode Notes. Recent topics have included the role of soil in combatting climate change (see the February 25, 2020 episode) and the profound cultural impact of McDonald's on the United States (see the January 27, 2020 episode).

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In the News

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Surreal or All Too Real? Exhibit Seeks to Correct Erasure of Women Surrealist Artists

Surrealism Was a Decidedly Feminine Movement. So Why Have So Many of Its Great Women Artists Been Forgotten?
https://news.artnet.com/exhibitions/kunsthalle-schirn-surrealist-women-1779669

Fantastic Women: Surreal Worlds from Meret Oppenheim to Frida Kahlo
https://luxelife.eu/fantastic-women-surreal-worlds-from-meret-oppenheim-to-frida-kahlo

Here come the 'angels of anarchy': Surrealist women to steal the shows in 2020
https://www.theartnewspaper.com/news/surreal-women-come-to-the-fore-in-series-of-shows

Fantastic Women
https://schirn.de/fantastischefrauen/digitorial/en/

I Paint My Reality: Surrealism in Latin America
https://nsuartmuseum.org/exhibition/i-paint-my-reality-surrealism-in-latin-america/

Frida Kahlo and Expression Through Self-Portraits Lesson Plan https://www.scholastic.com/teachers/lesson-plans/teaching-content/frida-kahlo-and-expression-through-self-portraits-lesson-plan/

Have you heard of Salvador Dali? What about Ithell Colquhoun? Despite both being key contributors to the Surrealist Movement, the lack of recognition for the latter represents a larger issue of gender disparity in the arts. Recognizing this problem, the Schirn Kunsthalle (an art museum in Frankfurt, Germany) debuted "Fantastic Women" in mid-February. The exhibition showcases 260 Surrealist pieces that explore various themes, including the idea that "[women] were never mere muses." Surrealism emerged as an artistic and literary movement in the early-1900s, presenting an opportunity for artists to dive deeply into their imaginations and subconscious. The movement is also regarded for "reject[ing] all traditionally masculine, patriarchal, and imperialist structures." The irony, of course, is that despite the position of femininity at the forefront of the movement, female artists were often left behind. Attributing long-overdue recognition, "Fantastic Women" uplifts the work of women Surrealists and "reveals how the art movement was shaped by many more female artists than historians have hitherto recognized." [EMB]

The first link leads to an article written by Kate Brown for artnetnews, highlighting the exhibit as well as the history of women artists being "overlooked and excluded from the male-dominated art historical canon." Following the second link, readers will find a discussion of the exhibition, including the themes and artists featured, published in Luxe Life Magazine. The third link leads to an article from The Art Newspaper by Joanna Moorhead which discusses "Surrealist Women" and similar upcoming exhibitions meant to celebrate Surrealist art with a "strong presence" from women artists. The remaining links provide additional context on the exhibition, as well as resources to better understand surrealism art and its notable contributors. The fourth link leads to the Schirn Kunsthalle Frankfurt's online portal for "Fantastic Women," where visitors will find an interactive digital companion to the physical exhibition. At the fifth link, readers can view an image gallery from the NSU Art Museum's Surrealist exhibition featuring the work of prominent Latin American artists including Leonara Carrington and Amelia Peláez. Finally, the sixth link may be of particular interest to educators, as it leads to a lesson plan about Frida Kahlo, a famous Surrealist artist known for using self-portraits as a medium to highlight various aspects of identity.